Scoliosis Prognosis
 

It is very difficult to predict the course that any given case of scoliosis will take. The condition's symptoms and rate of progression can vary significantly, and much depends on the severity of the spinal curve and whether or not it threatens the patient's vital organs. In most cases of scoliosis, the condition is diagnosed during adolescence; however, it can be hard to estimate how severe the spinal curve will become as the patient continues to grow, and the eventual outcome cannot ever be known for certain.  

 
The vast majority of spinal growth takes place within the first 5 years of a person's life and in the adolescent growth spurt that occurs during puberty. Therefore, the spinal growth of children with scoliosis in these age groups should be closely monitored. If action is made early on to reduce the spinal curve and promote healthy spinal growth, the prognosis usually improves.
 
However, if the condition isn't monitored and gets left untreated, the spinal curve may begin to severely threaten the patient's health. As well as the visual symptoms of scoliosis (such as uneven shoulders and hips), the patient may begin to develop back pain, and their spinal curve may start to put pressure on the nerves and even the entire spinal cord. This will lead to weakness, numbness, and pain in the lower region of the patient's spine; also, if the pressure is too severe, it may cause the patient to lose control / coordination of their leg muscles, making it difficult to walk normally.
 
Finally, if the chest becomes deformed due to the spinal condition, the lungs and heart may be affected, potentially leading to breathing problems, fatigue, and even heart failure. Thankfully, these symptoms can easily be prevented if the condition is monitored and interventions are made before the spinal curve can progress.
 
If you or your child suffer from scoliosis, please contact Scoliosis SOS and book an initial consultation with our scoliosis consultants. We will then be able to recommend the best course of action to ensure that your scoliosis prognosis is as positive as possible.