International Day of the Girl

Celebrated annually on 11 October, International Day of the Girl Child is a globally-recognised date that marks the achievements of young women all over the world and promotes female empowerment while also highlighting the challenges that girls face.

 

Scoliosis in Girls

There are many different types of scoliosis, but overall, the condition is significantly more common in females than it is males. This is particularly true of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS).

According to the Scoliosis Association (UK), roughly 5 out of 6 AIS patients are female - that's over 80% of recorded cases.

 

Scoliosis Women Worldwide

While scoliosis does affect a disproportionate number of females in relation to men, women globally have managed to overcome their spinal curves and live healthy, normal lives. We know because we've seen it first-hand!

Women from all over the world have come to the Scoliosis SOS Clinic to benefit from our non-invasive treatment methods.

Take mother and daughter Pia and Lova, who travelled all the way from Sweden to our clinic in London, UK. Despite a 33-year age gap, both Pia (47) and Lova (14) both returned to Sweden with dramatic improvements, proving that you can always improve your quality of life, regardless of age.

 

Active Women Worldwide

Our non-surgical treatment courses haven't just helped our female patients to live more comfortably. We've also helped women across the UK to hang onto their sporting passions and live a more active lifestyle.

From footballers and rugby players to jockeys and kickboxers, Scoliosis SOS has helped all sorts of young sportswomen to overcome their condition and stay active.

 

Live a Better Life

But you don't need to be an athlete to feel the benefits of our ScolioGold treatment programme. Many girls and women have come through our doors simply looking to better their health and improve their quality of life.

Sara Capacchione came to our clinic when she was 9 years old. Her older brother had already been diagnosed with scoliosis, and when Sara's spine started to develop a curve, her family were keen to nip it in the bud. Here's her story:

 

By actively battling back against the negative effects of scoliosis, young women across the world have been able to live their best lives in spite of their spinal curvatures.

If you'd like to find out more about ScolioGold treatment, please call the Scoliosis SOS Clinic on 0207 488 4428.

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Children in school

Most cases of scoliosis develop when the patient is between 10 and 15 years old. While the spine's curvature may be relatively mild to begin with, it can continue to get worse over the years that follow.

Currently, scoliosis tests are not compulsory in UK schools, but you can still check whether your child has scoliosis yourself. The Adams forward bending test is relatively easy to perform, but if you do think your child has scoliosis, you should get a second opinion from a GP.

 

Helping Your Child Cope with Scoliosis in School

School can be a stressful time for young children and teenagers alike, with friends, teachers and parents all contributing to the pressure in their own ways. A curved spine can make the average school day even more challenging - pupils with scoliosis might find sitting down or standing up for long periods uncomfortable, plus they might feel insecure about their appearance.

Here are a few suggestions that might make coping with scoliosis in school a little easier.

Communication

Start by speaking to your child to find out what issues their scoliosis is causing them at school. If you can establish an open line of conversation with your child, you'll be more likely to know right away if something's wrong.

Encourage your child to discuss their condition with their classmates so that they can understand what is going on and offer their support. Many of our patients have given in-class presentations about their treatment experiences, giving their peers an opportunity to learn about scoliosis and ask questions in a safe, relaxed environment.

Speak to Staff Members

Notify teachers about your child's condition. They might make allowances for your child to move around during lessons. PE teachers, in particular, might be able to make tweaks to their lesson plan so that your child's condition can be handled discreetly during PE lessons.

Pain Relief

If your child says that their scoliosis is causing them pain while they're at school, speak to your GP about pain relief. The doctor may be able to provide medication to help your child get through each school day comfortably. Also, where possible, make sure your child has comfortable shoes, feels comfortable in their uniform, and periodically ask them if their pain has got worse. If so, it might be time to pursue scoliosis treatment.

Exercises

If your child is embarrassed about wearing a scoliosis brace to school, or if the prospect of scoliosis surgery is too frightening, we encourage you to explore the exercise-based treatment options that we offer here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic. Always inspire and allow time for your child to do exercises to improve their scoliosis after school.

We've helped lots of children and young adults to improve their curved spines. Call 0207 488 4428 to speak to one of our expert Patient Care Coordinators, or use the links below to find out more!

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Mild Scoliosis in Child

If your child has recently been diagnosed with mild scoliosis, you have probably been given two options.

Option 1 is usually observation, which means that your child will attend check-up appointments every 6 months so that the doctor can track the progress of their condition. In other words, do nothing and wait for the size of the curve to increase. Scoliosis does tend to be a progressive condition, and an adolescent with scoliosis will usually get worse very quickly, especially if they still have lots of growing left to do.

So what's option 2? Well, depending on your child's age and the severity of their curve, they may be offered a scoliosis brace. Braces do vary, but they are usually hard, corset-style shells that must be worn for 23 hours a day in order to achieve the maximum benefit.

Wearing a scoliosis brace can be an effective way of preventing the curve's progression, but only if used in combination with exercise. If the patient doesn't exercise, bracing can lead to muscle wastage, and patients often flop back into their scoliotic posture once they're out of the brace because certain muscles weren't being used and are no longer able to support the spine.

ScolioGold: A Third Option

The specific scoliosis exercises taught here at Scoliosis SOS are geared towards strengthening the muscles surrounding the patient's spine. Our ScolioGold exercise programme works extremely well in combination with bracing - not only does it help patients to keep their muscles strong in preparation for coming out of the brace, it also educates them and helps them to understand their condition, enabling them to help themselves going forward.

If your child has recently been diagnosed with scoliosis, please contact us today for advice and information on the treatment we provide.

Check Your Child's Back

Summer time is fast approaching, and with holidays and days out planned, the shape of your child's spine is probably the last thing on your mind right now.

However, summer is the time when you are most likely to see your pre-teen/teenage child's back.

Scoliosis is usually idiopathic, meaning of unknown cause. Idiopathic scoliosis usually becomes apparent to parents around age 11-12, when children reach puberty and undergo rapid growth within a short period of time.

Here are some of the signs of scoliosis that, as a parent, you ought to look out for:

  • Rib hump (details here)
  • Different shoulder heights
  • Leaning to one side

Back pain is also often associated with scoliosis, most commonly affecting the lower back region. Pain may also occur in the neck or shoulders depending on the position of the curve. It has been suggested that there is no correlation between the size of the patient's curve and the level of pain they experience - some patients with large curves experience very little pain, while some patients with very mild curves experience significant pain.

I think my child has scoliosis - what do I need to do?

If you suspect that your child has scoliosis, please contact Scoliosis SOS today and one of our patient care coordinators will arrange an initial consultation. During this appointment, our consultant will take a radiation-free back scan of your child's spine, along with various other measurements. We will then be able to assess your child's condition and discuss a suitable treatment plan if necessary.

Are you born with scoliosis?

Scoliosis can potentially occur at any stage of a person's life. Some people grow up with curved spines, while others develop scoliosis in their old age. Every scoliosis sufferer's story is different.

With that in mind, it should come as no surprise that there's no single, straightforward answer to the question we're discussing today: are you born with scoliosis?

Idiopathic scoliosis

By far the most common form of scoliosis is idiopathic scoliosis - that is, a sideways spinal curvature that occurs without any clear cause.

Idiopathic scoliosis usually doesn't develop until the pre-teen / teenage years, so it would be incorrect to say that one is 'born' with this type of scoliosis. However, idiopathic scoliosis is widely believed to be rooted in genetic causes, so it might be said that some people are born with the genes that will one day manifest as a progressive spinal curve.

Congenital scoliosis

While scoliosis most commonly occurs during adolescence, it is occasionally the case that a visible spinal curvature is present from birth. Babies born with scoliosis are said to have congenital scoliosis, a condition that occurs when the baby's spine doesn't develop properly in the womb. A baby with congenital scoliosis may have multiple vertebrae joined together, or one or more vertebrae that didn't form completely.

Scoliosis in later life

Even if you weren't born with scoliosis and you didn't develop a spinal curve during your teenage years, there's no guarantee that you won't be affected by scoliosis later in life. Scoliosis can occur in fully-grown adults for a number of reasons, including:

  • Asymmetric degeneration. The human body deteriorates with age, and if one side of your body deteriorates more rapidly than the other, this may result in a sideways spinal curve.

  • Osteoporosis, a loss of bone density that is most common in post-menopausal women (read about osteoporosis here).

  • Spondylolisthesis, where a vertebra slips out of place (read about spondylolisthesis here).

Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we treat scoliosis in patients of all ages, from young children to people in their 60s, 70s and beyond. If you would like to arrange an initial consultation, please fill out our enquiry form here.