Woman jogging in the sunset

Celebrating the benefits of an active lifestyle, National Fitness Day takes place annually to help promote the benefits of physical fitness.

National Fitness Day 2019 falls on Wednesday 25 September. People across the UK will be encouraged to get active and commit to get fit in pursuit of healthier lives.

Organised by UK Active, this event aims to highlight the importance of keeping fit and staying active, regardless of your age and ability.

 

Staying fit with scoliosis

People with scoliosis sometimes find it difficult to take part in sports and other forms of strenuous exercise.

But scoliosis doesn’t have to dictate how you live your life, and it needn't stop you from participating in activities you enjoy.

It's a somewhat common misconception that sporting activity can make scoliosis worse. This myth has been debunked by medical professionals.

In fact, some sports can actually help to boost your flexibility and strengthen your core - particularly swimming, cycling and even football.

 

Usain Bolt has scoliosis!

For proof that people with scoliosis can achieve sporting glory, look no further than Olympic sprinter Usain Bolt.

Despite being born with scoliosis, the Jamaican youngster with the spinal curve never let it hamper his dreams, defying the odds to become one of the most celebrated Olympians in history.

Bolt overcame his spinal curvature and became known as the fastest man on Earth, shattering records in the 100m, 200m and 4 x 100m relay (and winning countless medals along the way).

 

Success stories from Scoliosis SOS

But Usain Bolt isn't the only scoliosis sufferer who's made his sporting dreams a reality. In fact, many of the patients we've treated here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic have managed to triumph over adversity and remain active despite their spinal issues.

Through their dedication and hard work, these people have been able to overcome the pain of scoliosis with the help of our non-surgical treatment courses, allowing them to continue to participate in the activities they love.

View some of our sporty success stories >

If you're struggling with scoliosis and you'd like to book a consultation with the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, please contact us today.

Exercises on holiday

Consistency is key, especially when it comes to your scoliosis exercises. When you come to the Scoliosis SOS Clinic for a treatment course, our ScolioGold therapists will teach you a set of therapeutic exercises that you'll need to complete every day once you've left us. This will help you to stay on top of your condition and continue reducing your Cobb angle measurement as time goes on.

Now, performing those exercises at home is one thing, but some of our patients find it difficult to keep up with their scoliosis stretches when they go on holiday. Reasons vary, but perhaps the most common problem is packing - it often isn't possible to fit all the necessary equipment in a suitcase.

But that doesn't mean you have to neglect your exercise routine while you're away!

 

Ellie's holiday scoliosis exercises

19-year-old Eleanor Ham is one of our past patients, and she understands the importance of consistently completing her scoliosis exercises, regardless of where she is.

As you can see in the video below, Ellie recently took a trip abroad, where she recorded herself completing a selection of stretches right where she was staying. In addition to demonstrating how easy it can be to complete your scoliosis exercises while on holiday, Ellie also provides a great example of how you can use common household objects as substitutes for any exercise equipment you've had to leave at home.

If you've been diagnosed with scoliosis, use the links below to get in touch with the Scoliosis SOS Clinic and find out how we can help you!

Contact Scoliosis SOS >   More Scoliosis Exercises >

Disclaimer: The information and video on this page should not be treated as medical advice. The scoliosis exercises described may not be suitable or beneficial for everyone. You should not begin any exercise routine without consulting a qualified health practitioner, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, elderly, or if you have any chronic or recurring conditions. Any application of scoliosis exercises suggested is at the viewer's sole discretion and risk. Scoliosis SOS accepts no responsibility or liability for any loss or injuries caused directly or indirectly through performing any of the exercises described here. If you feel any discomfort or pain during exercise, stop immediately. Always consult your own GP if you are in any way concerned about your health or anything associated with it.

Some time ago, we shared a series of stretches for scoliosis sufferers to perform in order to improve strength and balance while also relieving some of the aches and pains that a spinal curvature can cause.

While performing a few exercises at home is no substitute for attending a full ScolioGold treatment course here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we know that these stretches can be very beneficial in their own right, and so we'd like to share a few more suggestions today. As before, please note that performing these stretches does not mean you shouldn't also seek professional treatment for your scoliosis. They are designed to complement, not replace, other treatment methods.

Wall Stretch

Wall stretch

  1. Find a flat wall that you can stand against. (You can also use the floor if there's no available wall space.)

  2. Stand with your back to the wall and your feet slightly in front of you.

  3. Press your head/shoulders back so they're firmly against the wall.

  4. Push your lower back towards the wall. Try to touch the wall if you can (but don't strain too hard).

  5. Hold this position while you take three deep breaths in and out.

  6. Relax and repeat five times.

Watch a Video of This Stretch >

 

Doorway Stretch

Doorway stretch

  1. Stand in a doorway.

  2. Place one arm on the doorframe so that it's pointing upwards (your elbow should be bent to a 90° angle, and your upper arm should be roughly in line with your shoulder).

  3. Step forward with one leg (on the same side as your raised arm).

  4. Keeping your arm pressed against the doorframe and lean forward slightly. You should feel the stretch in your pectoral (chest) area.

  5. Hold this position for 30 seconds, then relax and repeat two more times.

  6. Finally, turn around and repeat steps 1-5 with the other side of your body.

Watch a Video of This Stretch >

 

Desk Stretch

Desk stretch

  1. Sit in a sturdy chair in front of a desk.

  2. Place your feet flat on the floor so that your knees are bent to a 90° angle.

  3. Place your arms under your desk with your palms down (so that the backs of your hands are touching the underside of the desk).

  4. Gently push upwards with your hands and forearms so that they're pressed against the underside of the desk.

  5. At the same time, stretch your upper back and allow your pelvis to rock forward slightly.

  6. Tuck in your chin so that you feel the stretch in your neck as well as your upper back.

  7. Hold this position for 30 seconds, then repeat twice.

Click here for more scoliosis exercises, or contact Scoliosis SOS today to arrange a consultation with Scoliosis SOS.

Lower Back Mobilisation

In the physiotherapy world, the word mobility refers to the freedom of movement that exists in a muscle or group of muscles. People with scoliosis often experience reduced mobility in their backs (frequently accompanied by pain).

Regularly performing lower back mobilisation exercises can help to:

  • Strengthen muscles in the lower back
  • Improve posture
  • Relieve lower back pain
  • Increase mobility
  • Reduce the likelihood of injury

There are lots of different mobility exercises that you can try. Here at Scoliosis SOS, we try to tailor all of our corrective exercises to each patient's specific condition - the exercise, how often you should do it, and the other exercises we recommend incorporating into your routine are largely dependant on the severity of your scoliosis, and on your end goal. If you are someone who wants to run a marathon, you may need to perform lower back mobilisation exercises more frequently than someone with no such aspirations.

Watch the video below for a lower back mobilisation exercise that has helped many of our scoliosis patients.

This exercise uses a flat surface (e.g. the wall or the floor) to straighten your spine while you stretch your lower back muscles. Over time, repetition of this exercise will not only improve mobility and posture, it will also help to relieve tension and pain in the lower back.

If you suffer from scoliosis and think you may benefit from one of our exercise-based treatment courses, please get in touch today. We're happy to answer any questions you might have.

Contact Scoliosis SOS >   More Scoliosis Exercises >

Back Strengthening Exercise

Individuals with idiopathic scoliosis don't always experience pain as a result of this condition, but there may be a loss of back strength depending on the severity of the spinal curvature. With the right exercises, however, this can be overcome - for instance, it may be beneficial to place greater emphasis on enhancing the strength, range of motion, and length-tension relationship of the working muscles on either side of the vertebral column.

Range of Motion

Defined as the 'measurement of movement around a specific joint in the body', range of motion simply refers to how freely a particular part of your body can move. In the case of idiopathic scoliosis, an 'S' or 'C' curve can result in shortened musculature on the concave working muscles of the spine. These differences can dramatically decrease the unilateral range of motion at different joints in the spine, leading to reduced mobility and irregularities in one's posture.

Strength

Back strength is essential for balance, posture and the transmission of power throughout the body. Each of these factors can make a big difference to everyday activities such as going up and down stairs, picking up objects, and standing up from a sitting position. Incorporating back strengthening exercises into a corrective scoliosis treatment programme can significantly improve functional strength and postural symmetry.

Flexibility

Defined as the 'ability of a joint to move freely through its range of motion', flexibility is an important consideration for scoliosis therapists as it plays a vital role in restoring a regular length-tension relationship in the patient's tightened skeletal muscles. Improved flexibility can result in enhanced postural symmetry, improved performance, reduced pain, and minimised risk of further injuries.

The video below showcases an effective back strengthening exercise that you can try at home:

Regular exercise is vital when attempting to correct and alleviate the symptoms of scoliosis. The exercise in the video above is just one of many that can aid in improving the strength, flexibility and range of motion in your spine.

More Scoliosis Exercises >   Contact Scoliosis SOS >