Lots of Scoliosis SOS patients ask us the same question:

What will I need to do after my treatment to continue seeing results?

The typical length of a ScolioGold treatment course is 4 weeks, and while our patients routinely see significant improvements within this short time, it is the long-term results that they (and we) are most concerned with!

During those 4 weeks of treatment, we teach every patient a set of exercises and stretches that will help them to continue their treatment independently when they get home. Each patient leaves our clinic with a daily exercise plan that's tailored to their condition and long-term goals.

To give you a better idea of what those daily exercise routines contain, we spoke to Eleanor - who started ScolioGold treatment back in 2016 - and asked her a few questions about her daily exercise routine and how her scoliosis has been since she left the clinic.

Scoliosis SOS patient Eleanor

Hi Eleanor! How did your initial ScolioGold treatment course help you?

I started treatment 3 years ago, when I was 12 years old. My consultant had told me that I needed to have surgery on my back because my curve was progressing, but my mum researched other options on the Internet and found the Scoliosis SOS Clinic. I did a 4-week course during my summer school holidays, and within a couple of days of starting treatment, my parents noticed that I was standing taller and straighter. By the time I finished treatment a month later, I had grown 3cm!

The main thing it has helped with is my self-confidence; I no longer feel ashamed of my back or have to hide under baggy jumpers. The best part was when we saw the consultant for a check-up appointment he said that I was no longer a candidate for surgery.

 

How often have you come back to the clinic since then?

I usually come back to see my therapist Charlie every 3 months, but once I have finished growing this will change to every 6 months. I grew a lot last year, so at Christmas, I did a refresher week where I learnt a few more advanced exercises and joined a couple of the group therapy sessions too.

 

What exercises do you do at home?

At my appointments, Charlie gives me a new exercise schedule that tells me what I have to do on each day. It's nice to have a change, and it keeps me motivated when I go back home. Each day includes 3 specific exercises and a couple of stretches. My favourite is side-lying with a pole as I can really feel my muscles working when I do it and it always makes me feel straighter afterwards.

Some of the other things I do are: muscular cylinder, prone on stool, semi-hanging, PNF Pacquet and ASC.

 

How often do you do scoliosis exercises at home?

As I am still growing, I have to do 45 minutes of exercise each day.

 

Are the continued exercises helping you to manage your condition?

I have been discharged from the hospital, but the measurements and scans Charlie does at my check-ups show that my condition is stable and it improved a bit more after I did the refresher week.

 

If you're suffering from scoliosis, we can provide an entirely exercise-based treatment course that will help you to manage your condition independently. To enquire about our treatment courses, give us a call on 0207 488 4428 or use the links below.

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Best Sitting Position for Scoliosis

If you've been diagnosed with scoliosis, you may need to analyse certain things that you've never really thought about before. Posture is a great example - do you slouch when you're sitting down? Are you putting excessive pressure on some areas of your body? Do you find yourself suddenly sitting up straight as you're reading this?

Posture is very important regardless of whether you're standing or sitting, but since the average person in the UK spends 9 hours a day sitting down, it may be particularly important to assess your current sit-uation and identify the best sitting position for your scoliosis.

Though your curved spine may make it somewhat difficult to maintain a good sitting position, a few slight adjustments could do you a world of good. Bad posture can expend your energy more quickly than a good posture, so it is better for your health overall if you know the best way to sit.

What is the best sitting position for scoliosis?

The best way to sit if you have scoliosis is by trying to sit back into your chair while keeping your back straight. The weight should be spread out across your buttocks and thighs. Try to stop the pelvis from tilting forwards or backwards by not sitting too far forward in your chair.

It is advised to try and keep your knees lower than your hips and your feet flat on the floor. Try to avoid crossing your legs, as this stops you aligning your body properly and can lead to lower back pain, If possible, try to move frequently, as staying still for too long can make your muscles feel tight and tense.

There are many chairs which can help support your back and improve your sitting position with scoliosis. An ergonomic chair is best for your health. If you do not have one of these, support cushions for the lower back can also help.

Desk exercises for scoliosis patients

If you are one of the many people who spend the working day sitting at a desk, desk exercises are a great way to help relieve any tension. These exercises are especially important if you have scoliosis, as a bad posture for a prolonged period can cause more issues in the future.

Here's a simple desk exercise to help with your sitting position. This should be repeated at 30-minute intervals:

Thoracic Extension at Desk

Thoracic Extension

  • As shown above, a thoracic extension involves sitting forwards in your seat, bending your knees 90 degrees and placing your feet flat on the floor.
  • Next, place the places of your hand and half of your forearm under your desk with your elbows bent at 90 degrees.
  • Then apply pressure on the desk, while extending your back and rocking for pelvis forward.
  • Elongate your neck and hold for 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

Click here for more desk exercises to try at work >

Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we're dedicated to providing the best possible care for those suffering from scoliosis and similar conditions. To find out what we can do for you, please get in touch with us today.

Neck pain and computer use

Neck pain is strongly associated with excessive use of computers.

Office workers have a higher incidence of neck pain than people in any other occupation. However, the relationship between symptoms and risk factors is currently still unclear.

A recent research study was conducted by the University of Queensland to examine the relationship between self-reported neck pain and a range of individual and work-related factors. Office workers both with and without neck pain were recruited for the study.

All participants completed a survey, which included a numerical pain rating scale and such independent variables as:

  • Demographic
  • Individual
  • Work-related factors
  • Neck/shoulder muscle strength
  • Endurance
  • Range of motion

So what were the results of the study?

Neck pain was significantly associated with females in senior occupational roles and those working more than 6 hours a day on the computer, which resulted in a reduced cervical flexion.

Many of our patients here at Scoliosis SOS find that they struggle with being seated at a computer for long periods of time. There are lots of ways in which patients can adapt their seated position to ensure they stay in their corrected posture. We encourage patients to take regular breaks from their computers and ensure they know how to cope when working at a desk.

If you suffer from scoliosis or neck pain, please contact us today. Our experts can offer advice, treatment and a spinal/ergonomic assessment.

Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we specialise in the non-surgical treatment of spinal conditions such as scoliosis and hyperkyphosis. Our approach combines a variety of different methods, including various types of exercise, physical manipulation and more.

For sufferers of scoliosis and other spinal conditions, uneven posture can be a persistent problem, causing pain and discomfort as well as impacting the individual's outward appearance. For this reason, postural correction is one of the goals we work towards during our ScolioGold treatment courses, the aim being to produce lasting posture improvement for the patient. 

How do we achieve posture improvement for our patients?

Successful posture improvement is achieved by tailoring treatment to the specific needs of the patient, depending on their individual condition and the symptoms they experience.

While scoliosis (a sideways curvature of the spine) can lead to postural problems, the idea that scoliosis is caused by bad posture is a common misconception. There is no evidence to suggest that poor posture can lead to the development of scoliosis, which sometimes arises because of an underlying neuromuscular/skeletal condition but which is idiopathic in the majority of cases. In contrast, hyperkyphosis (a forward curvature of the spine) can be caused by poor posture, with an estimated 20-40% of adults developing this deformity at some point in their life.

Since we treat different types of spinal curvature in patients of all ages and backgrounds, it is highly important for us to ensure that our treatments target the specific areas in need of improvement. We do this by using a selection of carefully-chosen corrective methods while also accounting for the impact and limitations caused by other aspects of the patient's condition. In addition, each patient is also provided with an exercise programme to perform at home in order to ensure lasting results.

What methods are used?

Here are some of the posture improvement methods we use here at Scoliosis SOS:

FITS Method

FITS Method

This programme of individually-adjusted exercises is used to eliminate myofascial restrictions and build a series of new, corrective posture patterns.

Taping
This technique is used to promote correct muscle movement patterns while also reducing pain and inflammation. The tape, which has been worn by such famous athletes as Serena Williams and Gareth Bale, works by acting as an elastic reminder for postural control.
 
Medical Acupuncture
This treatment involves the insertion of very fine needles into points of the body to reduce pain, improve blood flow and promote healing. Acupuncture is used to target pain caused by muscular imbalances and postural asymmetry. 

Looking for more information about posture improvement methods? Here are some exercises to try at home.

Contact Scoliosis SOS for more information about our treatment courses.