Lots of Scoliosis SOS patients ask us the same question:

What will I need to do after my treatment to continue seeing results?

The typical length of a ScolioGold treatment course is 4 weeks, and while our patients routinely see significant improvements within this short time, it is the long-term results that they (and we) are most concerned with!

During those 4 weeks of treatment, we teach every patient a set of exercises and stretches that will help them to continue their treatment independently when they get home. Each patient leaves our clinic with a daily exercise plan that's tailored to their condition and long-term goals.

To give you a better idea of what those daily exercise routines contain, we spoke to Eleanor - who started ScolioGold treatment back in 2016 - and asked her a few questions about her daily exercise routine and how her scoliosis has been since she left the clinic.

Scoliosis SOS patient Eleanor

Hi Eleanor! How did your initial ScolioGold treatment course help you?

I started treatment 3 years ago, when I was 12 years old. My consultant had told me that I needed to have surgery on my back because my curve was progressing, but my mum researched other options on the Internet and found the Scoliosis SOS Clinic. I did a 4-week course during my summer school holidays, and within a couple of days of starting treatment, my parents noticed that I was standing taller and straighter. By the time I finished treatment a month later, I had grown 3cm!

The main thing it has helped with is my self-confidence; I no longer feel ashamed of my back or have to hide under baggy jumpers. The best part was when we saw the consultant for a check-up appointment he said that I was no longer a candidate for surgery.

 

How often have you come back to the clinic since then?

I usually come back to see my therapist Charlie every 3 months, but once I have finished growing this will change to every 6 months. I grew a lot last year, so at Christmas, I did a refresher week where I learnt a few more advanced exercises and joined a couple of the group therapy sessions too.

 

What exercises do you do at home?

At my appointments, Charlie gives me a new exercise schedule that tells me what I have to do on each day. It's nice to have a change, and it keeps me motivated when I go back home. Each day includes 3 specific exercises and a couple of stretches. My favourite is side-lying with a pole as I can really feel my muscles working when I do it and it always makes me feel straighter afterwards.

Some of the other things I do are: muscular cylinder, prone on stool, semi-hanging, PNF Pacquet and ASC.

 

How often do you do scoliosis exercises at home?

As I am still growing, I have to do 45 minutes of exercise each day.

 

Are the continued exercises helping you to manage your condition?

I have been discharged from the hospital, but the measurements and scans Charlie does at my check-ups show that my condition is stable and it improved a bit more after I did the refresher week.

 

If you're suffering from scoliosis, we can provide an entirely exercise-based treatment course that will help you to manage your condition independently. To enquire about our treatment courses, give us a call on 0207 488 4428 or use the links below.

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We at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic are all about helping our patients to manage their scoliosis independently. When you attend one of our treatment courses, our therapists will teach you a range of corrective and strengthening exercises to combat your spinal curvature; you will then need to continue performing these exercises at home in order to keep your scoliosis under control.

Many of the exercises we recommend require particular pieces of equipment. These are, for the most part, relatively common, and may even be things that you already own. Read on to find out what you'll need to keep up your scoliosis exercises once you've left the clinic.

Please note: all exercise equipment can be purchased from the Scoliosis SOS Clinic directly. Please don't stop or avoid doing your scoliosis exercises if you can't find the equipment you need in shops.

 

Poles for scoliosis exercises

Poles and Chin-Up Bars

One of the main ways we are able to control our patients' elongation during treatment is by using poles and wall bars. They help to straighten the spine while giving the patient something to hold on to for guidance and stability. We recommend that our patients use a chin-up bar in place of wall bars and, because many chin-up bars are portable and relatively inexpensive, this can be a great investment for patients who are going on holiday.

 

Plastic tubes and wooden blocks

Wooden Blocks and Plastic Tubes

You will become very familiar with these plastic pipes and wooden blocks by the end of your ScolioGold course. Our physiotherapists use the blocks to correctly position you during exercises, and they use the pipes to help you stretch and elongate when prone.

Having these pieces of equipment at home will help you achieve the same results, although you may need to ask a friend or partner for some assistance.

 

Strap and belt exercises

Strap and Belt

These are definitely among the more unusual pieces of equipment that we use in our scoliosis exercise routines. The strap and belt are secured to the wall bars, and they help our physiotherapists to stabilise the patient's pelvis during different exercises.

This is a great piece of equipment for you to purchase if pelvis alignment is one of your key treatment goals.

 

Beanbags, wedges and resistance bands

Wedges, Beanbags and Resistance Bands

Besides being nice and comfortable, these beanbags and wedges help to de-align and rotate your spine. They will also come in very handy while you complete other exercises that require different parts of your body to be supported while you exercise.

We also recommend that you purchase a variety of resistance bands. These will help you to build up the strength of your muscles during FITS, PNF and stabilisation techniques.

 

Exercise mats and stability ball

Exercise Mats and Stability Balls

Suitable for most forms of floor-based exercise, an exercise mat can cushion you against hard and cold floor surfaces. If you plan to exercise on wood flooring (or even outside on the patio), investing in an exercise mat is a great idea!

The stability ball is a piece of equipment that we incorporate into many of our scoliosis exercises. It's an incredibly versatile apparatus that can help you to build strength and improve your balance. If you don't already have one at home, we recommend purchasing one - they're great fun and very useful!

 

Plastic stool and trigger point balls

Plastic Stools and Trigger Point Balls

Lightweight plastic stools are perfect for positioning yourself during exercises. We're sure you already have something like this at home, but if not, now might be the time to purchase some.

The colourful, spikey balls you see above are trigger point balls. They provide proprioceptive feedback and muscle stimulation.

 

Foam roller and stability disk in use

Foam Rollers and Stability Disks

Foam rollers (like the blue one pictured above) are specifically for hyperkyphosis patients. They help patients to work the deep tissue around the spine, and can also be used to relieve muscular aches and pains.

Stability disks are used by patients who have completed more advanced exercises during their treatment. By balancing on the stability disk while holding corrective poses, patients are able to improve their balance and strength.

Remember that you can purchase all of this scoliosis exercise equipment directly from the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, so don't worry if you're struggling to find something that you've enjoyed using during your treatment.

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Previously on the Scoliosis SOS blog, we have talked about some of the exercises that scoliosis sufferers can perform at home in order to combat their condition. But while these exercises work well on a sideways spinal curve, they may not be so effective if you suffer from hyperkyphosis - a forward curve of the upper (thoracic) spine.

We at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic treat each patient using a combination of non-surgical spinal techniques to ensure that all aspects of their condition are fully treated, without the use of a brace or spinal fusion surgery. To help you overcome your hyperkyphosis, we're going to run through a few exercises you can do at home that will help relieve some of your symptoms.

Please note that these stretches should not be used as a substitute for a full treatment course delivered by a chartered physiotherapist.

Superman Stretch

Superman Stretch

  1. Lie on your stomach and extend your hands in front of your head.
  2. Keeping your head in a neutral position, look towards the floor, and lift your legs and arms up towards the ceiling.
  3. Reach away from your body with your hands and feet.
  4. Hold this position for 3 seconds, and repeat 10 times.

 

Happy Cat Sad Cat Stretch

Happy Cat, Sad Cat Stretch

The goal of this stretch is to increase the mobility of your spine.

  1. On all fours, place your knees hip-width apart, with your hands under your shoulders. Keep your spine in a neutral position.
  2. Round your back, tuck your bottom under, and drop your head between your arms.
  3. Holding this position, inhale and try to curve your back even further to increase the stretch.
  4. Then, during exhalation, arch your back, stick your bottom out, and look up towards the ceiling.
  5. Repeat this cycle 10 times, using your breathing to help you slowly transition between the two positions.

 

Head Retraction Stretch

Head Retraction Stretch 

The goal of this exercise is to stretch and exercise weakened neck muscles.

  1. Lie down on the floor, and pull your chin in as if you were trying to make a double chin.
  2. Hold this for 15 seconds, and repeat five to ten times.

 

Chin Retraction Stretch

Chin Retraction Stretch

This exercise stretches your deep neck extensors.

  1. Stand up as straight as you can - you can do this against a wall if it helps. 
  2. Tuck your chin slightly, and bring your head back directly over your shoulders. 
  3. Bring own, and hold this position for 30 seconds - take a break if you begin to feel pain.

If you suffer from hyperkyphosis, please do not be afraid to contact us - we'd be overjoyed to help you overcome your condition with our non-surgical treatment regime.

Disclaimer: The above information should not be treated as medical advice and the scoliosis exercises described may not be suitable or beneficial for everyone. You should not begin any exercise routine without consulting a qualified health practitioner, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, elderly, or if you have any chronic or recurring conditions. Any application of scoliosis exercises suggested is at the reader's sole discretion and risk. Scoliosis SOS accepts no responsibility or liability for any loss or injuries caused directly or indirectly through the performing of any exercises described. If you feel any discomfort or pain during exercise, stop immediately. Always consult your own GP if you are in any way concerned about your health or anything associated with it.

Spine Straightening Exercises

The effects of scoliosis can be very detrimental to one's life. While some patients suffer only minor discomfort, others suffer from chronic pain. The curve of the spine is often the cause of this discomfort, leading to problems with the neck, shoulders, hips, and the back itself.

In order to combat this pain and discomfort, our own ScolioGold treatment method includes a wide variety of spine-straightening exercises. ScolioGold therapy has repeatedly proven capable of reducing the curve in the spine - see our results here.

If you do not want to undergo surgery for whatever reason, there are many exercises we can teach you to help with the effects of scoliosis. Here are some spine-straightening exercises that you can try at home:

Standing against the wall to straighten spine

Standing against a wall

The simple exercise can actually help improve your posture and build strength! All you need is a flat wall to stand against - here's what to do once you've found one:

  1. Stand with your head and shoulders pressed firmly against the wall behind you and place your feet approximately 20cm in front of you.
  2. Push your lower back towards the wall and hold this position for a few seconds.
  3. Take a few deep breaths and then breathe out as you relax. Repeat.

 

Planking exercise

Planking

Planking is a helpful spine-straightening exercise as it strengthens your core muscles whilst also targeting your lower back to help improve posture. Here's what you need to do:

  1. Lie on the floor on your front (use a mat to avoid slipping, as shown in the photo above).
  2. Hold yourself up using your forearms and toes and raise your whole body off the floor.
  3. Keeping your legs straight and your hips raised, place your shoulders directly above your elbows to create a straight line from head to toe.
  4. Hold this position for 5 seconds, then relax and repeat again several times.

 

Bird Dog Stretch

'Bird dog' stretches (leg/arm extensions)

This is another strengthening exercise. It is often performed with a gym ball (as shown in the photo above), but you can still do this exercise if you don't have one handy.

  1. Firstly, lie face-down on the ball and gradually extend your right arm whilst using your left arm to support you (same technique without the ball).
  2. While holding this position, gradually extend your left leg up behind you as shown below.

Spine straightening exercise on gym ball

3. Hold for a couple of seconds, then alternate to the opposite limbs. Repeat this alternating movement back and forth between right and left.

Interested in completing a full treatment course at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic? To book your consultation or request more information, please contact us today.

Exercise after Scoliosis Surgery

In a particularly severe case of scoliosis, surgery may be the only way to prevent the patient's spinal curvature from continuing to get worse. Spinal fusion surgery, while generally effective, is a major operation from which it typically takes months to fully recover.

After undergoing this type of surgery, it is often necessary to make some lifestyle changes in order to minimise your recovery time. For instance, bending, lifting and twisting should all be avoided in the weeks immediately following a spinal fusion procedure, as your spine and incision will need time to heal.

Later in the recovery process, you can start to consider your regular exercise routine. Many patients who undergo scoliosis surgery are able to maintain their usual lifestyle after the operation, but changes do sometimes need to be made to reduce pressure on the spinal area.

Can you exercise after scoliosis surgery?

Yes, you can, although the more important question is how long you ought to wait before exercising again. As mentioned above, heavy lifting, bending and twisting are all strictly off-limits to begin with; indeed, intense exercise of any sort is best avoided at this point. However, low-impact exercises - such as walking and swimming - will benefit both your health and the ongoing fusion process.

Before you can return to your usual sport and exercise habits, your skin will need to heal from the incision and your bones will need to fuse together again. This can take anywhere from 6-9 months. Your surgeon will be able to tell you when you're sufficiently healed, at which point you'll hopefully be able to ease back into more physically-demanding exercises and activities.

What exercises can you do after scoliosis surgery?

As a general rule, anything that puts too much pressure on your spine is best avoided after scoliosis surgery. Heavy weightlifting, high-impact sports like rugby, and exercises that involve your abs can all damage your spine again and should be removed from your exercise regime.

Exercises that involve flexion of the spine or neck, such as sit-ups and squats, can place pressure on the discs above and below the spinal fusion site. These should also be avoided as much as possible, although they can be replaced with more gentle stretching exercises.

It is best to swap high-intensity exercise for more frequent low-impact exercise after scoliosis surgery. Recommended post-surgery activities include:

  • Swimming
  • Gentle yoga
  • Bicycle rides
  • Elliptical machine training

In this way, you can still maintain an active lifestyle without fear of damaging your vertebrae, discs or spinal cord.

Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we believe that exercise is the best method for fighting spinal curvature. We treat both patients who are looking to avoid surgery and those who have already had a spinal fusion. Our non-surgical ScolioGold treatment courses combine stretches, exercises, and massages to reduce the angle of your spinal curve and improve your quality of life. Contact us now to arrange an initial consultation.

Worried that your scoliosis will prevent you from taking part in your favourite sport? Read about some of our sporty success stories here!