Inspirational scoliosis quote

Scoliosis is a condition that affects people from all walks of life. Countless people with scoliosis use social media, blogs and other media outlets to share their personal experiences and offer support to others.

Here are just a few scoliosis quotes from people who have dealt with their condition in the public eye:

 

Celebrities

A number of well-known public figures have used their positions of influence to raise awareness about scoliosis and to be positive role models for others with the condition.

 

Princess Eugenie of York, British Royal

Here's what Princess Eugenie said after her wedding to Jack Brooksbank, during which she wore a dress that showed off the scar from her spinal fusion surgery:

"I believe scars are like memories that tell a story on your body, that remind you of how strong you had to be, and that you survived to talk about it. Your scars are a way of communicating, and sharing a trauma can be healing in so many ways - it can release the stigma you might have given to yourself, and by talking about it, you can show people how they can heal too."

 

Kurt Cobain, American Musician

Here is an excerpt from an interview that the troubled Nirvana frontman gave in 1993:

"When I stand, everything is sideways, it's weird...I go to a chiropractor every once in a while...most people have a small curvature in their spine anyhow, though some people have it really bad and have to wear metal braces. It gives me back pain all the time. That really adds the pain to our music. It really does. I'm kind of grateful for it."

 

Usain Bolt, Jamaican Athlete

Here's what Bolt had to say when asked about his scoliosis in a 2011 interview with ESPN:

"When I was younger it wasn't really a problem. But you grow and it gets worse. My spine's really curved bad...but if I keep my core and back strong, the scoliosis doesn't really bother me. So I don't have to worry about it as long as I work hard."

 See Also: Famous People with Scoliosis

 

Scoliosis Influencers

We at Scoliosis SOS have been lucky enough to speak with a number of inspiring people who are working to raise awareness of scoliosis and provide support for those who have it. Here is some of their advice for people with scoliosis:

 

Leah Stoltz, Founder of Curvy Girls

"Talk about how you're feeling! Don't keep it bundled inside. Find support: a trusted friend, a parent, an online forum, Instagram page, Facebook group, book...there are so many ways to feel supported and to talk with other girls who are going though what you are going through."

Read Full Interview >

 

Rachel Mulvaney, Vice President of Curvy Girls

"Throughout my bracing years, I was told that my chronic back pain did not exist because scoliosis 'does not cause any pain'. I was one of many patients who was spoken to in this way. But after learning a programme [the Schroth method] that both validated and eliminated my pain, I was determined to spread the word. I wanted to make sure all Curvy Girl families had the opportunity to know that this treatment existed."

Read Full Interview >

 

Louise Laurie, Scoliosis Blogger

"Every case is different, but I would say that mindset is everything. I used to feel so down about my back, but I've realised that having scoliosis does not have to hold you back - you can achieve anything you put your mind to."

Read Full Interview >

 

@scolilife, Scoliosis Tweeter

"As cheesy as it sounds, things get better. When I was diagnosed, I thought my life was over - it was the biggest deal, and no matter what, everything seemed like bad news or just another complication to add to my growing list. But soon enough, you adjust to the brace. The X-rays become fun. The appointments become bonding time with your family. Your scoliosis becomes a point of pride rather than disappointment, and you become stronger and more independent because of it."

Read Full Interview >

 

Chloe Donhou, Spinal Fusion Patient

Chloe underwent spinal fusion surgery live on Channel 5 earlier this year, a spectacle that gave viewers a real insight into what scoliosis surgery actually entails. Here's something she said after sitting for a painting that was featured on scoliosis blog The Curvy Truth:

"I have always felt the need to cover up my scoliosis as I hated the way my back looked. Wearing clothes was difficult as I felt they sat weirdly on my back. I became so annoyed with myself that I couldn’t just accept it, so I felt that having this piece [a painting of her back] done would allow me to see that it really isn’t that bad after all. The painting is now hung up on my bedroom wall and I see it every day. Seeing it all the time really allowed me to come to terms with it - I accept who I am and I love me for it!"

 

If you are suffering from scoliosis, don't think you are alone. There are people all around who are willing to help and support you - for instance, take a look at our list of scoliosis support groups around the world.

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Several individuals with scoliosis (a sideways curvature of the spine)

Every year, scoliosis sufferers and those close to them recognise the month of June as Scoliosis Awareness Month. This is an annual opportunity for people all over the world to come together, speak out about life with a curved spine, and educate others about what it means to have scoliosis.

This month-long event culminates in International Scoliosis Awareness Day, which falls on the last Saturday of June (meaning that the date to remember this year is 29th June 2019). The UK Scoliosis Association (SAUK) launched International Scoliosis Awareness Day six years ago - here, in the organisation's own words, is why they did it:

"SAUK launched ISAD in 2013 to unite people across the world to create positive public awareness of scoliosis, promote education, and bring together those affected."

 

How do people mark Scoliosis Awareness Month?

People mark this annual occasion in a number of different ways. If you use Twitter, keep an eye out for the hashtag #ScoliosisAwarenessMonth - throughout June, people with scoliosis use this tag to share their stories, their X-ray scans, and photos of their curved backs and surgery scars. All of these posts are intermingled with advice for fellow scoliosis patients and useful information about the condition.

There will also be a number of events taking place in recognition of Scoliosis Awareness Month. In June 2017, for instance, the Curvy Girls support group organised a large walk in New Jersey to raise awareness of spinal curvature.

 

4 things you should know about scoliosis

We're keen to do our bit for Scoliosis Awareness Month too, so here - for the benefit of anyone who is unfamiliar with this condition - are 4 things we think everyone should know about scoliosis. Feel free to share this post to help raise awareness!

1. What is scoliosis?

Scoliosis is a condition where the spine curves sideways, often resulting in symptoms such as pain, reduced flexibility, muscular imbalance, and (in extreme cases) compromised breathing.

Watch our video to find out more:

For a rough idea of what scoliosis actually looks like, consult the diagram below. However, do bear in mind that every case of scoliosis is different - symptoms, severity, and curve location vary hugely from one person to the next.

Scoliosis symptoms

2. How common is scoliosis?

Scoliosis affects roughly 4% of people worldwide (i.e. approximately 1 in 25 people). It can occur in any individual regardless of age or gender; however, it is most commonly found in adolescent girls. Read more >

3. What causes scoliosis?

There are many different types of scoliosis with many possible causes. By far the most common form is idiopathic scoliosis, which usually develops during adolescence and has no known cause, though it is thought to be linked to genetic factors.

However, scoliosis can also be caused by:

  • Birth defects
  • Old age
  • A wide range of conditions including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, spondylolisthesis, and many more

It's worth noting that scoliosis is NOT caused by carrying heavy bags, though this is a common misconception. Read more >

4. How is scoliosis treated?

Scoliosis can be treated using a number of different methods, with bracing and spinal fusion surgery being the most common. Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic in London, England, we treat scoliosis using a combination of non-surgical, exercise-based techniques that we call the ScolioGold method. This approach - using physical therapy to reduce the patient's spinal curve and improve their quality of life - has shown itself to be very effective. View results >

If you need more information about scoliosis, or if you're interested in the treatment courses we provide here at Scoliosis SOS, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

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Happy 13th Birthday Scoliosis SOS

The Scoliosis SOS Clinic was founded by Erika Maude on 29 May 2006 - which means we're 13 today!

We've achieved a lot in the last 13 years. Here are just a few highlights:

Most importantly, though, we've helped thousands of people with scoliosis to take control of their condition, keep doing the things they love, and - in many cases - completely avoid undergoing spinal fusion surgery.

We'd like to say a huge THANK YOU to all the patients (and their families) who have visited the Scoliosis SOS Clinic over the past 13 years. It's been a huge honour to meet and help so many of you - long may it continue!

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The history of scoliosis therapy can be traced all the way back to ancient Greece.

More specifically, scoliosis treatment has its roots in the 5th century BC and one man in particular: Greek physician Hippocrates (c. 460 – 370 BC).

Statue of Hippocrates

Who was Hippocrates?

The mid-to-late 5th century BC was a turbulent time for the Hellenic people.

From 431 to 404 BC, the country was entrenched in a titanic war between the Delian League of Athens and the Peloponnesian League of Sparta. Meanwhile, Athens was also suffering from a devastating plague, which wreaked havoc in the city periodically between 430 and 426 BC.

In short, it was a dark time for Greece. But this was also the period that gave us Hippocrates, often referred to as the 'father of medicine'.

Born on the island of Kos around 460 BC, Hippocrates was the son of a physician and is believed to have learned the trade from his father. Among his long list of medical achievements, Hippocrates is heralded as the first person to theorise that diseases and ailments were caused by environmental factors and not the result of superstition or an act of the gods.

He's also the namesake of the 'Hippocratic Oath': the pledge taken by doctors declaring their moral and ethical obligations to their patients as medical practitioners.

Hippocrates and Scoliosis

Separating medicine from religion would probably have been enough on its own to secure Hippocrates's place in history, but his achievements go far beyond that. Notably, he was also a key figure in the history of spinal treatment, and he is believed to have been the first physician to focus on the anatomy and pathology of the human spine.

Through his revolutionary study of the spinal structure and vertebrae, Hippocrates's work led to the pioneering identification of many spine-related diseases – including scoliosis.

Hippocrates is commonly credited as the person who coined the term 'scoliosis' and the first to try treating this condition.

Scoliosis

Hippocratic Scoliosis Treatment

From his unprecedented study of orthopaedics, Hippocrates created three pieces of equipment to treat spinal ailments: namely the Hippocratic ladder, the Hippocratic board, and the Hippocratic bench.

Hippocratic Ladder

Intended to reduce spinal curvatures, the Hippocratic ladder treatment required the patient to be elevated and tied to the ladder upright or head down (depending on the where the curvature lay). The patient would then be shaken on the ladder, with the gravitational pull theoretically straightening the spine.

Hippocratic Board

Similar to the ladder, treatment via the Hippocratic board involved the patient being tied to the board; however, this time, the patient was required to be prone, lying face down and flat. The physician would then apply pressure to the affected area of the spine using a hand, foot, or even the entire weight of the body.

Hippocratic Bench

Also known as the Hippocratic scamnum, the bench technique saw the patient lie face down on a bench similar to the board technique above. A smaller wooden board was then inserted into a pre-made hole in the wall, leaving the plank protruding out above the patient's back. An assistant would then apply pressure on the end of the plank while the physician manoeuvred the board along the body.

Like many ancient treatments, these techniques naturally seem archaic, even barbaric by today's standards. Nevertheless, these apparatuses – based on the principles of axial traction and three-point correction – were hugely innovative at the time, and they had a profound influence on the direction of spinal treatment to follow.

Luckily, medical science has come a long way since the days of Hippocrates, and there are now a variety of comfortable and safe non-surgical scoliosis treatments available. At Scoliosis SOS, our team of friendly, skilled therapists offer patients specialised scoliosis treatment that's specifically designed to enhance your quality of life.

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Scoliosis and Menopause

Menopause usually occurs between the ages of 45 and 55, although it can come earlier or later. Symptoms of the menopause can be quite unpleasant at times; many women experience hot flushes, night sweats and depression (to name a few).

The arrival of the menopause also tends to trigger a loss of bone density. This is known as osteoporosis, and unfortunately, it can increase your risk of developing a curvature of the spine - especially if you already had bad postural habits.

Retaining your bone strength

There are a few ways to slow down the rate at which your bones weaken once you've reached menopause. The NHS recommend:

  • Exercising regularly
  • Eating a healthy, nutrient-rich diet
  • Increasing your vitamin D levels (i.e. spending more time in the sun)
  • Stopping smoking
  • Reducing your alcohol intake
  • Taking calcium / vitamin D supplements

Treating your scoliosis

Even if you do all the things listed above, you may still find that your spine is developing a curve. The good news is that there are plenty of different treatment options that can help you to improve the look and feel of your back.

Read our Scoliosis Treatment in Adults blog to see some of the different treatment options that are available at this stage of life. Most often, you will be offered one or a combination of the following treatments:

  • Physiotherapy
  • Hydrotherapy
  • Pain Management
  • Spinal Surgery

What do we have to offer?

Here at the Scoliosis SOS clinic, we have treated lots of women who were suffering from adult degenerative scoliosis. Our exercise-based ScolioGold therapy programme is tailored to each patient's scoliosis curvature so that we can help them to achieve their specific treatment goals.

Our physical therapy courses may be able to:

  • Relieve pain in your back
  • Boost your mobility / flexibility
  • Reduce the visibility of your curvature

If you have any questions about scoliosis treatment, please feel free to get in touch with our specialist team, who will be able to advise you on the best course of action.

Enquire About ScolioGold Treatment Today >