Mild Scoliosis in Child

If your child has recently been diagnosed with mild scoliosis, you have probably been given two options.

Option 1 is usually observation, which means that your child will attend check-up appointments every 6 months so that the doctor can track the progress of their condition. In other words, do nothing and wait for the size of the curve to increase. Scoliosis does tend to be a progressive condition, and an adolescent with scoliosis will usually get worse very quickly, especially if they still have lots of growing left to do.

So what's option 2? Well, depending on your child's age and the severity of their curve, they may be offered a scoliosis brace. Braces do vary, but they are usually hard, corset-style shells that must be worn for 23 hours a day in order to achieve the maximum benefit.

Wearing a scoliosis brace can be an effective way of preventing the curve's progression, but only if used in combination with exercise. If the patient doesn't exercise, bracing can lead to muscle wastage, and patients often flop back into their scoliotic posture once they're out of the brace because certain muscles weren't being used and are no longer able to support the spine.

ScolioGold: A Third Option

The specific scoliosis exercises taught here at Scoliosis SOS are geared towards strengthening the muscles surrounding the patient's spine. Our ScolioGold exercise programme works extremely well in combination with bracing - not only does it help patients to keep their muscles strong in preparation for coming out of the brace, it also educates them and helps them to understand their condition, enabling them to help themselves going forward.

If your child has recently been diagnosed with scoliosis, please contact us today for advice and information on the treatment we provide.

Travelling with Scoliosis

If you have scoliosis, you have probably suffered from back and/or shoulder pain in some form over the course of your life.

People with scoliosis often experience increased discomfort when they have to sit down for long periods of time. This means that long-haul flights and even long car journeys can become logistical nightmares - scoliosis-related pain can occur at any age, and even a mild spinal curve can cause a lot of pain.

Preparation is key!

When you book your flight, try to plan a schedule that will minimise your stress:

  • Consider taking a flight where there will be fewer people on board (and thus more room for you to lie across the seats if necessary).

  • Contact the airline prior to booking your flight and let them know that you suffer from back pain. They may be able to provide you with more information on which flights are least crowded.

  • If possible, try to limit your down time between in-flight connections or layovers.

  • If you can help it, don't schedule a flight that will require you to wake up extremely early.

During the journey

Once you've done some preparation, you can start thinking about how you will keep pain at bay during the flight itself:

  • Some kind of lower back support - e.g. a back roll or a couple of pillows from the flight attendant - can be a good way to prevent slouching and keep your spine straight, minimising lower back pain.

  • Bring a pillow to support your neck. Travel pillows can often be purchased at the airport if you forget to bring your own.

  • If you are unable to position your legs at a right angle while seated on the plane, ask for something (pillows, blankets) to prop your feet up and keep your knees at a right angle. Doing so keeps stress off the lower back.

  • If you have long legs, request an exit row or bulkhead seat, as these generally offer more leg room.

  • Ask for an upgrade! Occasionally, airlines will have additional seats with extra leg room available in first / business class, and if you explain your situation, they may upgrade you free of charge.

  • Move around during the flight. Staying still for prolonged periods stresses the spine and can make back pain much worse.

  • See if there is room at the back of the plane to do some quick stretches - these can improve flexibility and ease stiffness. Just make sure you stay in your seat during turbulence!

If you are a Scoliosis SOS patient and you're planning to go on a long car journey or flight, make sure you speak to your ScolioGold therapist and get some advice on what you can do to make your journey as comfortable as possible.

Contact Scoliosis SOS >

Best Sitting Position for Scoliosis

If you've been diagnosed with scoliosis, you may need to analyse certain things that you've never really thought about before. Posture is a great example - do you slouch when you're sitting down? Are you putting excessive pressure on some areas of your body? Do you find yourself suddenly sitting up straight as you're reading this?

Posture is very important regardless of whether you're standing or sitting, but since the average person in the UK spends 9 hours a day sitting down, it may be particularly important to assess your current sit-uation and identify the best sitting position for your scoliosis.

Though your curved spine may make it somewhat difficult to maintain a good sitting position, a few slight adjustments could do you a world of good. Bad posture can expend your energy more quickly than a good posture, so it is better for your health overall if you know the best way to sit.

What is the best sitting position for scoliosis?

The best way to sit if you have scoliosis is by trying to sit back into your chair while keeping your back straight. The weight should be spread out across your buttocks and thighs. Try to stop the pelvis from tilting forwards or backwards by not sitting too far forward in your chair.

It is advised to try and keep your knees lower than your hips and your feet flat on the floor. Try to avoid crossing your legs, as this stops you aligning your body properly and can lead to lower back pain, If possible, try to move frequently, as staying still for too long can make your muscles feel tight and tense.

There are many chairs which can help support your back and improve your sitting position with scoliosis. An ergonomic chair is best for your health. If you do not have one of these, support cushions for the lower back can also help.

Desk exercises for scoliosis patients

If you are one of the many people who spend the working day sitting at a desk, desk exercises are a great way to help relieve any tension. These exercises are especially important if you have scoliosis, as a bad posture for a prolonged period can cause more issues in the future.

Here's a simple desk exercise to help with your sitting position. This should be repeated at 30-minute intervals:

Thoracic Extension at Desk

Thoracic Extension

  • As shown above, a thoracic extension involves sitting forwards in your seat, bending your knees 90 degrees and placing your feet flat on the floor.
  • Next, place the places of your hand and half of your forearm under your desk with your elbows bent at 90 degrees.
  • Then apply pressure on the desk, while extending your back and rocking for pelvis forward.
  • Elongate your neck and hold for 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times.

Click here for more desk exercises to try at work >

Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we're dedicated to providing the best possible care for those suffering from scoliosis and similar conditions. To find out what we can do for you, please get in touch with us today.

Lumbar Scoliosis Treatment

Scoliosis can occur in any part of the spine, and different names are used to describe curves in different locations. If scoliosis specifically affects the upper spine, this is called thoracic scoliosis; if it affects the lower part of the spine, it is called lumbar scoliosis.

In today's blog post, we're specifically going to talk about lumbar scoliosis and how it can be treated.

About lumbar scoliosis

Lumbar scoliosis is often idiopathic, but it can also be linked to neuromuscular conditions. Some people are even born with lumbar scoliosis (see congenital scoliosis).

This type of scoliosis is characterised by the appearance of a C-shaped (or reverse C-shaped) curve in the lower section of the patient's spine. In extreme cases, lumbar scoliosis can materialise in combination with thoracic scoliosis to form an S-shaped (or reverse S-shaped) curve with the thoracic curve going in one direction, and the lumbar curve going in the opposite direction. 

Visual symptoms of lumbar scoliosis include:

  • Uneven waist
  • Hips, shoulders and/or rib cage different heights
  • Body leaning to one side

How can lumbar scoliosis be treated?

The best treatment for lumbar scoliosis depends on a number of factors, from the age and overall health of the patient to the severity of the spinal curve. If the patient is experiencing any pain or inflammation, the doctor may prescribe ibuprofen or another type of pain relief medication to reduce this discomfort. In other cases, the doctor may recommend that you undergo a course of corticosteroid injections in the spine to reduce inflammation; these injections are performed under an X-ray, but the patient can receive this treatment no more than 4 times in a 6-12 month period.

In cases where the curve is progressing (continuing to worsen) and there is a risk that it will impact the general health and wellbeing of the patient, it may be recommended that the patient undergoes spinal fusion - a surgical procedure that involves the insertion of rods and screws into the spine. Like most surgical procedures, there are a few side effects and risks associated with this treatment method, and this does put some patients off.

Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we offer a non-surgical treatment programme that consists of a combination of spinal exercises and techniques from around the world, ensuring that all aspects of the patient's condition are treated. We call this the ScolioGold method.

If you or a loved one suffer from any form of scoliosis, please contact Scoliosis SOS today to arrange an initial consultation or simply find out more about our treatment courses.