Scoliosis Brace Clothing

Minors who are diagnosed with scoliosis (an excessive curvature of the spine) are often told to wear a scoliosis brace to prevent the curve from getting worse as they continue to grow. Bracing is an important part of the treatment process in many cases, but wearing a rigid plastic shell every day can take some getting used to.

If you have to start wearing a scoliosis brace, there's a good chance that it will affect the way you dress. Of course, you should wear whatever you feel comfortable in, but we're here to give you a few pointers on the tricky topic of scoliosis brace clothing.

What to wear with a scoliosis brace

  • Tight-fitting clothes underneath the brace

To make your scoliosis brace feel as comfortable as possible, we recommend wearing some thin clothes beneath it. Try to find light, tight-fitting garments, as these will ensure that your brace is still able to do its job. Things like a cami top, tank top or a vest are suitable to wear beneath most braces. However, if your scoliosis brace reaches your armpits, you may be more comfortable wearing a t-shirt. It may also be more comfortable to wear leggings or tights on your lower half as this will cover the area where the brace sits.

  • Long tops and asymmetrical shirts/dresses

Concerned about what your brace might look like? Long, flowing tops are an attractive and concealing fashion choice. Long tops are perfect for summer (as well as for layering up in the winter). Similarly, asymmetrical shirts and dresses can help cover up parts of the scoliosis brace you don't want to show. The off-the-shoulder fit can cover the auxiliary piece of the brace, and the slanting trim will be able to cover any part of your brace that goes down to your hip.

  • Hoodies and elasticated trousers

You may find you prefer wearing elasticated trousers over or underneath your scoliosis brace. Either way, elasticated trousers are a good go-to piece of clothing, and will keep you looking smart. Hoodies are also great for both guys and girls who would prefer to layer up when wearing a brace. They're ideal for keeping you warm and comfortable during the winter months, too.

  • Maxi dresses and pleated skirts for special occasions

If you're looking for something to wear to an event whilst wearing your scoliosis brace, we recommend maxi dresses and pleated skirts. Both cover the outline of the brace from the hip down beautifully. The elasticated waist will emphasise your waistline, which may be concealed slightly by the brace, and the pleated skirts will emphasise your hips.

  • Layered clothing

A scoliosis brace can cause your clothes to feel slightly uncomfortable as they may hang differently. If you find this is the case, layering up can help your clothes feel more comfortable. For example, wearing an infinity scarf, a long cardigan or even a jacket can help conceal any areas of the brace which may show through your clothes. It's also a really cosy fashion statement all year through and can help boost your confidence when dressing with a scoliosis brace.

The Scoliosis SOS Clinic provides treatment to scoliosis patients of all ages. If you'd like to arrange an initial consultation, please contact us today!

Check Your Child's Back

Summer time is fast approaching, and with holidays and days out planned, the shape of your child's spine is probably the last thing on your mind right now.

However, summer is the time when you are most likely to see your pre-teen/teenage child's back.

Scoliosis is usually idiopathic, meaning of unknown cause. Idiopathic scoliosis usually becomes apparent to parents around age 11-12, when children reach puberty and undergo rapid growth within a short period of time.

Here are some of the signs of scoliosis that, as a parent, you ought to look out for:

  • Rib hump (details here)
  • Different shoulder heights
  • Leaning to one side

Back pain is also often associated with scoliosis, most commonly affecting the lower back region. Pain may also occur in the neck or shoulders depending on the position of the curve. It has been suggested that there is no correlation between the size of the patient's curve and the level of pain they experience - some patients with large curves experience very little pain, while some patients with very mild curves experience significant pain.

I think my child has scoliosis - what do I need to do?

If you suspect that your child has scoliosis, please contact Scoliosis SOS today and one of our patient care coordinators will arrange an initial consultation. During this appointment, our consultant will take a radiation-free back scan of your child's spine, along with various other measurements. We will then be able to assess your child's condition and discuss a suitable treatment plan if necessary.

Several individuals with scoliosis (a sideways curvature of the spine)

Every year, scoliosis sufferers and those close to them recognise the month of June as Scoliosis Awareness Month. This is an annual opportunity for people all over the world to come together, speak out about life with a curved spine, and educate others about what it means to have scoliosis.

This month-long event culminates in International Scoliosis Awareness Day, which falls on the last Saturday of June (meaning that the date to remember this year is 30th June 2018). The UK Scoliosis Association (SAUK) launched International Scoliosis Awareness Day five years ago - here, in the organisation's own words, is why they did it:

"SAUK launched ISAD in 2013 to unite people across the world to create positive public awareness of scoliosis, promote education, and bring together those affected."

 

How do people mark Scoliosis Awareness Month?

People mark this annual occasion in a number of different ways. If you use Twitter, you may already have seen the hashtag #ScoliosisAwarenessMonth doing the rounds - scoliosis sufferers are using this tag to share their stories, their X-ray scans, and photos of their curved backs and surgery scars. All of these posts are intermingled with advice for fellow scoliosis patients and useful information about the condition.

There are also a number of events taking place in recognition of Scoliosis Awareness Month. Last year, for instance, the Curvy Girls support group organised a large walk in New Jersey to raise awareness of spinal curvature.

 

4 things you should know about scoliosis

We're keen to do our bit for Scoliosis Awareness Month too, so here - for the benefit of anyone who is unfamiliar with this condition - are 4 things we think everyone should know about scoliosis. Feel free to share this post to help raise awareness!

1. What is scoliosis?

Scoliosis is a condition where the spine curves sideways, often resulting in symptoms such as pain, reduced flexibility, muscular imbalance, and (in extreme cases) compromised breathing. Read more >

For a rough idea of what scoliosis looks like, consult the diagram below. However, do bear in mind that every case of scoliosis is different - symptoms, severity, and curve location vary hugely from one person to the next.

Scoliosis symptoms

2. How common is scoliosis?

Scoliosis affects roughly 4% of people worldwide (i.e. approximately 1 in 25 people). It can occur in any individual regardless of age or gender; however, it is most commonly found in adolescent girls. Read more >

3. What causes scoliosis?

There are many different types of scoliosis with many possible causes. By far the most common form is idiopathic scoliosis, which usually develops during adolescence and has no known cause, though it is thought to be linked to genetic factors.

However, scoliosis can also be caused by:

  • Birth defects
  • Old age
  • A wide range of conditions including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, spondylolisthesis, and many more

It's worth noting that scoliosis is NOT caused by carrying heavy bags, though this is a common misconception. Read more >

4. How is scoliosis treated?

Scoliosis can be treated using a number of different methods, with bracing and spinal fusion surgery being the most common. Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic in London, England, we treat scoliosis using a combination of non-surgical, exercise-based techniques that we collectively call the ScolioGold method. This approach - using physical therapy to reduce the patient's spinal curve and improve their quality of life - has shown itself to be very effective. View results >

If you need more information about scoliosis, or if you're interested in the treatment courses we provide here at Scoliosis SOS, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

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