Scoliosis test

Are you worried that your child may have a curved spine? Perhaps you suffer from scoliosis yourself, and you’d like to know whether or not the condition has been passed to your son or daughter?

Fortunately, there is an informal test for scoliosis that may help to put your mind at ease. The Adams forward bending test – demonstrated in the video below – is a quick and easy way to check your little one for signs of scoliosis. It can be performed at home and does not require any special medical equipment.

Please note that this test should not be used in lieu of a diagnosis from a qualified medical professional. If you believe that you or your child are suffering from scoliosis, be sure to see your GP.

The Adams Forward Bending Test

Here’s a step-by-step guide to checking your child for scoliosis:

  • Have your child take off their top and stand with their back to you.

  • While your child is standing up straight, look for visible signs of scoliosis – do their shoulders, ribs, neck, waist and hips look symmetrical? Or do they appear to be skewed towards one side?

  • Now ask your child to bend forward at the waist.

  • Once your child is in the forward bending position, look at their back. Does one side of their rib cage look higher than the other?

While no body is perfectly symmetrical, any obvious unevenness that you notice may potentially be a sign of scoliosis. Again, we strongly recommend visiting a doctor if you are concerned that a spinal curvature may be present.

Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we provide effective non-surgical treatment for scoliosis sufferers of all ages. Click here to see before and after photos of our youngest patients, or get in touch today to arrange a consultation with us.

Signs of Scoliosis
 

When it comes to treating scoliosis, it is highly beneficial to spot the signs of scoliosis and their progression as early as possible, in order to have the best chance of preventing the spinal curvature from becoming more severe. In order to do this, the symptoms must be recognised in the individual sufferer, in order for them to be examined and diagnosed by a medical professional.

The difficulty with this arises because symptoms often vary from case to case and can be difficult to spot until the curvature is at a later stage of progression. For this reason, it is important to familiarise oneself with the range of symptoms which may be signs of scoliosis, in order to ensure that appropriate treatment is provided as early as possible. 
 
Here’s a closer look at some of the signs of scoliosis across all the age ranges:

Signs of Scoliosis in Babies

In children under the age of five, the condition is referred to as early-onset or infantile scoliosis and can be classified as one of the several possible forms of the disease, including congenital, syndromic and neuromuscular. In those aged 3 or under, this can be difficult to detect and can have a number of outcomes depending on each case. For some, the curve may improve, while other cases will see the curve progress as the child continues to grow. To help spot possible symptoms and signs of scoliosis as soon as possible, here are a few signs to keep in mind: 
  • A difference in shoulder height.
  • Unusual head position (not centred with the rest of the body).
  • Hip and shoulder blade height/position. 
  • The way arms hang beside the body when standing.
  • The sides of the back having an uneven appearance when bending forward.

 

Signs of Scoliosis in Adolescents 

This is the age group that is most commonly impacted by idiopathic scoliosis, developing during puberty as the body begins to grow more rapidly. The majority of curves tend to slow in progression as the individual matures, however, the most severe curves will continue to progress into adulthood. Although some scoliosis sufferers experience pain as a result of their condition, this is not true of every case. Meaning that other symptoms should also be taken into consideration alongside this. Signs of scoliosis in adolescents include:
  • Rib hump/prominence: a lateral shift of the chest relative to the pelvis.
  • Shoulder height asymmetry where one shoulder appears higher than the other.
  • Torso leaning to the right or left, which can also result in one hip appearing higher, or one leg appearing longer than the other.
  • Pain in the lower back (particularly inactive individuals).
  • Uneven skin folds where one side indents more than the other.

Take a look at our video here on how to check for signs of scoliosis in your child:

 

Signs of Scoliosis in Adults 

While the signs of scoliosis are usually spotted at an earlier age, there are cases of scoliosis which develop or manifest themselves in older patients. Although early-onset cases and syndrome-connected forms of scoliosis are known to impact adults, the two main forms of adult scoliosis are adult idiopathic scoliosis and adult degenerative scoliosis. Both these forms of the disease are progressive over time, with those of 50 degrees progressing more rapidly than those beneath this threshold. In the case of degenerative scoliosis, this is caused by a degeneration of the discs, arthritis of the facet joints, and the collapse/wedging of disc spaces, typically seen in the lumbar area of the spine. Signs of scoliosis in adults include:
  • Lower back pain and stiffness.
  • Leaning forwards due to trapped nerves/loss of natural curve. 
  • Numbness and shooting pains in the legs.
  • Fatigue due to stress on lower back and leg muscles, which are placed under strain as a result of the curvature.
  • Shortness of breath due to reduced lung capacity (in severe cases).
 
Here at Scoliosis SOS, we have treated patients with a variety of scoliosis symptoms over the years, each belonging to a variety of age groups, with their own areas of concern regarding their condition and its impact on their daily life. To find out more about the non-surgical treatment we are able to provide here at Scoliosis SOS, simply get in touch with us today to request information or to book an initial consultation below
 
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