Scoliosis Hong Kong

Over the years, we at Scoliosis SOS have been privileged enough to treat patients from practically every corner of the world. Not only is it very gratifying to know that people are willing to travel thousands of miles in order to receive treatment from our ScolioGold-certified therapists, we also find it very educational and enlightening to meet people from so many different countries. As you’ll see on our Overseas Patients map, we’ve welcomed scoliosis sufferers from all over the world through the doors of our clinic!

For instance, quite a few patients have come to us from China – including Hong Kong, which used to be a British colony but is now a special administrative region of the People’s Republic of China. 

Hong Kong Map

Case Study: Saffron & Tobey

Saffron and Tobey Turl are two siblings who live in Hong Kong. Both of them have curved spines: Saffron, who had been experiencing unexplained back pain for a while, was diagnosed thanks to a school health screening, while her younger brother’s curvature was spotted by their mum when he was running shirtless one day (Tobey is a keen distance runner!).

In order to get their spinal curves under control, Saffron and Tobey travelled nearly 6 thousand miles to reach our clinic in London. Once here, they completed an intensive exercise-based treatment regime that got great results for both of them.

During a refresher visit, Saffie and Tobey sat down for a quick chat about their experiences at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic. Watch the video below to find out what they had to say.

About Scoliosis SOS

Scoliosis SOS specialise in providing non-surgical treatment for scoliosis and other spinal conditions such as hyperkyphosis. We use a unique treatment method called ScolioGold – this is a combination of numerous proven techniques (including the Schroth method, osteopathy, myofascial release, and trigger point therapy) that we selected ourselves in order to treat every part of each patient’s condition.

The Scoliosis SOS Clinic can be found on Mansell Street in the City of London. We offer on-site accommodation for patients who do not live locally, and our convenient location means that all of London’s most popular tourist attractions are practically on our doorstep. 

Whether you hail from Hong Kong or another part of the world, we would be thrilled to welcome you to the Scoliosis SOS Clinic. Click here to arrange a consultation – this can be carried out over the phone, via Skype, or in person here at the clinic.
SIJ joint
 
One of the biggest obstacles for those who treat scoliosis is the number of secondary complaints that can arise as a result of a spinal curve. One such issue is sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain, which can originate from the joint itself as well as being referred from the lumbar spine in many cases. 
 
The SIJ joins the spine to the pelvis, and is made up of the sacrum along with the right and left ilium (as illustrated in the diagram above). The sacrum is a triangular bone that sits just below the lumbar spine, while the right and left ilium comprise part of the pelvis, more commonly referred to as the hip bones.

What causes pain in the sacroiliac joint?

It can be difficult to differentiate between the kind of SIJ pain that originates in the joint itself and the kind that comes from the lumbar spine – this is simply due to the fact that the patterns of referral are often highly similar to one another. Both forms of pain will often occur over the SIJ, buttocks/posterior, or lateral thigh, making it difficult to identify the root cause. 
 
Pain can also be caused by pelvic dysfunction, which refers to a disturbance in the normal movement of the SIJ during movement. This can occur due to myofascial restrictions, which develop when normal patterns of muscle recruitment are altered, or when a restriction within the SIJ itself is present.

How is this connected to scoliosis?

SIJ pain is often reported in those with scoliosis, and this is likely due to the secondary impact of the spinal curvature on this part of the body. The unnatural curvature of the spine has an impact on the alignment of the joint, which results in pain and movement dysfunction in this area.
 
For this reason, it is highly important to monitor and assess the signs of pelvic dysfunction in scoliosis sufferers in order to ensure that any treatment administered for the spinal condition is also considering the possible impact on the SIJ. By doing this, appropriate manual therapy techniques can be applied in order to restore optimal alignment and movement in this area.
 
therapy for SIJ pain

Can SIJ pain be improved?

In order to effectively treat the pain and discomfort caused by pelvic dysfunction, it is important to begin by conducting a thorough assessment. This can be done by performing a variety of kinetic tests (which assess the movement of the ilium and sacrum) during exercises such as single leg standing, as well as trunk flexion whilst upstanding and sitting. 
 
If positional assessment of the area reveals the cause of the dysfunction, this information should be used to prescribe the correct range of manual therapy techniques, selected based on the type of restriction and presentation. These can then be used to restore the correct muscle recruitment pattern, joint alignment, and normal pelvic movement.
 
Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, our aim is to offer a highly tailored and unique treatment to each of our patients, including a thorough evaluation of each individual’s specific needs and complaints. This means that sources of pain, secondary conditions and other contributing factors are all taken into consideration so as to offer a treatment plan that meets the specific aims of the patient – without causing reactionary damage to other parts of the body.
 
To find out more about our ScolioGold treatment method, please click here.

While scoliosis usually starts to develop during puberty, it is not unheard of for the condition to arise far later in life. We frequently treat elderly scoliosis sufferers here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, and whereas our younger patients usually have what’s known as idiopathic scoliosis (a progressive spinal curvature with no apparent cause), scoliosis in older people almost always occurs as the result of another, underlying condition.

Very often, that underlying condition is osteoporosis.
 
Osteoporosis vs. Normal Bone Density

What is osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a weakening of the bones that commonly occurs in later life. As we age, our bones naturally lose mass and become more fragile, although this process happens more quickly in some people than others. You are particularly at risk of osteoporosis if:
  • You are going through, or have already experienced, the menopause (reduced oestrogen levels often lead to a rapid decrease in bone mass, particularly when the menopause occurs before the age of 45)
  • You have a very low BMI
  • You drink and/or smoke heavily
  • You don’t get enough calcium and vitamin D in your diet
  • Osteoporosis runs in your family
  • You don’t get enough exercise
  • You have had your ovaries removed (e.g. due to ovarian cancer)
  • You have been taking certain medications (such as corticosteroids) for an extended period of time

Symptoms of osteoporosis

Osteoporosis doesn’t have any symptoms in and of itself, but it is problematic because weak bones are far easier to break. Reduced bone mass can easily be identified via an X-ray or DEXA bone mineral density scan; however, many osteoporosis sufferers remain unaware of their condition until they break a bone (usually a hip, wrist, rib or vertebra).
 
Increased risk of fracture isn’t the only issue that can arise due to osteoporosis. When the bones in the spine lose their strength and density, the spine can begin to slip into a curved position as it becomes too weak to support the weight of your upper body. This is how many osteoporosis sufferers end up suffering from hyperkyphosis (a forward curvature of the spine) or scoliosis (a sideways curvature of the spine).
 
Osteoporosis & Curvature of the Spine

Treating osteoporosis and osteoporosis-related scoliosis

Once osteoporosis has been diagnosed – and again, this often doesn’t happen until after the patient has suffered a fracture – the condition can sometimes be managed using medication that helps to strengthen the patient’s bones. Doctors may also recommend dietary/lifestyle changes to help slow the deterioration of the bones, and certain measures can be taken to reduce the risk of a fracture (e.g. removing household hazards that may result in a fall).
 
When scoliosis arises as the result of osteoporosis, it can be treated in a number of different ways. Some patients will undergo surgery to correct their spinal curvature, but it is usually possible to manage the condition with physical therapy – eliminating the need for surgical intervention.
 
Located in the City of London, the Scoliosis SOS Clinic treats scoliosis and hyperkyphosis sufferers using the ScolioGold method (a combination of specially selected non-surgical treatment techniques). Click here to see the results that this approach can achieve for elderly patients, or contact Scoliosis SOS now to arrange a consultation.
Scoliosis Prognosis
 

It is very difficult to predict the course that any given case of scoliosis will take. The condition’s symptoms and rate of progression can vary significantly, and much depends on the severity of the spinal curve and whether or not it threatens the patient’s vital organs. In most cases of scoliosis, the condition is diagnosed during adolescence; however, it can be hard to estimate an accurate scoliosis prognosis as the patient continues to grow, and the eventual outcome cannot ever be known for certain.  

 
The vast majority of spinal growth takes place within the first 5 years of a person’s life and in the adolescent growth spurt that occurs during puberty. Therefore, the spinal growth of children with scoliosis in these age groups should be closely monitored. If action is made early on to reduce the spinal curve and promote healthy spinal growth, the prognosis of scoliosis usually improves.
 
However, if the condition isn’t monitored and gets left untreated, the spinal curve may begin to severely threaten the patient’s health. As well as the visual symptoms of scoliosis (such as uneven shoulders and hips), the patient may begin to develop back pain, and their spinal curve may start to put pressure on the nerves and even the entire spinal cord. This will lead to weakness, numbness, and pain in the lower region of the patient’s spine; also, if the pressure is too severe, it may cause the patient to lose control/coordination of their leg muscles, making it difficult to walk normally.
 
Finally, if the chest becomes deformed due to the spinal condition, the lungs and heart may be affected, potentially leading to breathing problems, fatigue, and even heart failure. Thankfully, these symptoms can easily be prevented if the condition is monitored and interventions are made before the spinal curve can progress.
 

Improving your scoliosis prognosis 

With the help of our qualified and experienced practitioners, you are able to identify signs of scoliosis early. Allowing you to take the necessary steps to limit the effects, possibly improving your quality of life and delivering a healthier scoliosis prognosis. If you believe you or your child may suffer from scoliosis, simply get in touch with us to book your consultation! 

Book a Consultation >

 
Yoga for Scoliosis

It seems that yoga classes are popping up everywhere these days, and this ancient Indian practice has also become very popular among online communities. Placing emphasis on psychological and physical balance, yoga is often used to improve an individual’s physical ability, as well as their mental well-being. This is achieved via a combination of poses and breathing exercises, which are said to improve strength and flexibility while also combating the negative effects of everyday life (such as stress and bad posture).

While yoga has received a lot of good press in the health and wellness industry, it’s important to examine how yoga is being promoted to those with specific medical conditions, including scoliosis. The benefits of yoga have been well documented, but we feel that it is also important to scrutinise the ways in which some people are presenting this approach as a viable, non-surgical treatment for curvature of the spine.

How is yoga used to treat scoliosis?

The form of yoga that is sometimes used to treat scoliosis is called hatha (which, in Sanskrit, simply means ‘force’). Hatha yoga focuses on physical postures and exercises, but also emphasises proper breathing, mental exercises, and a controlled diet.

The main aim of yoga-based scoliosis treatment is to create proper alignment within the body while minimising pain and spinal damage. This is achieved by focusing on a number of key areas, including:

  • Strengthening the feet and legs (supposedly relieving some of the burden on your spine)
  • Straightening / lengthening the spine
  • Aligning the lower limbs with the torso for improved function
  • Addressing the rounding of the back
  • Strengthening the core muscles to prevent the back from tightening
  • Incorporation of breathing awareness to improve structural alignment

Should I use yoga to treat my scoliosis?

While yoga can lead to a number of positive benefits for scoliosis sufferers – most notably improved posture and muscle strength, as well as pain relief in some cases – the use of yoga as a scoliosis treatment should be regarded with caution. This is especially true if you are visiting a class or treatment centre that does not cater specifically to the demands of scoliosis sufferers; scoliotic spines don’t always behave in the same way as healthy spines, and this can prove problematic when scoliosis patients participate in certain exercises and activities.

In particular, scoliosis sufferers who practice yoga should be careful when performing exercises that involve:

  • Backward / forward bending
  • Torso twists
  • Sideways bends
  • Shoulder stands
  • Bending of the rib cage

The problem is the sheer variety of different deviations that exist in scoliosis patients. Ideally, all treatments (whether yoga-based or not) should be specifically tailored to the patient’s unique condition while also assessing potential areas of concern in order to avoid secondary risks.

Is there a safer alternative to yoga for scoliosis sufferers?

For those who wish to treat their scoliosis without surgery, there are other non-surgical treatment methods available – methods that provide the corrective and strengthening benefits of yoga while also doing more to address the individual needs of the patient. Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we use our own ScolioGold treatment method: this is a combined programme of non-surgical techniques that we specifically created to address a combination of issues present in individuals suffering from scoliosis. In order to provide the best results, patient outcomes and treatments are constantly monitored and updated in line with the latest medical research in our field.

Click here to find out more about our ScolioGold treatment programme, or get in touch with Scoliosis SOS today to arrange a consultation.

Chiropractic Treatment
 
If you’re somewhat familiar with chiropractic therapy, you might assume that it’s an ideal treatment for scoliosis (sideways curvature of the spine). Chiropractic focuses primarily on the spine, and if you’re a scoliosis sufferer, going to a chiropractor can seem like a far preferable alternative to wearing a brace or undergoing spinal fusion surgery.
 
But can chiropractic treatment really combat scoliosis effectively? That’s the question we’ll be attempting to answer today.

What is chiropractic?

Chiropractic is a form of medicine that is used to diagnose and treat musculoskeletal disorders, with practitioners using their hands (or a machine) to perform treatments on the bones, muscles and joints, which are commonly referred to as ‘manual therapies’. Chiropractic treatment usually involves a range of techniques, although this is often focused on the manipulation of the patient’s spine, in order to treat conditions which cause pain in the neck and lower back, including scoliosis.
 
While those who practice chiropractic are considered to be part of the healthcare profession, there have been many debates and controversies relating to its effectiveness over the years, particularly due to the fact that it does not refer to a single treatment. While there is evidence to support the fact that chiropractic medicine can improve and relieve persistent lower back pain, there is no strong evidence to suggest that it has the ability to treat other conditions.

Can chiropractors treat scoliosis?

As mentioned above, there is evidence to suggest that chiropractic has the ability to effectively treat lower back pain; however, this may not provide effective relief for the majority of scoliosis sufferers. Studies have shown that the practice is most effective in cases of acute, short-term pain, which means that it is unlikely to provide long-term results for patients with scoliosis, particularly for those with moderate to severe curves. In addition, there are some practitioners who treat scoliosis in the same manner as other spinal conditions, which is unsuitable for a condition which requires a unique approach, and can vary hugely from patient to patient.
 
Chiropractic treatment also does nothing to address the muscular imbalance that results from the development of a scoliotic curve, and it relies on the patient returning to see their chiropractor on a regular basis to maintain the desired level of pain relief.

Are there any alternatives to chiropractic treatment?

While the repositioning of joints can contribute towards successful treatment, this should be complimented with other treatment methods in order to achieve long-term success. Here at Scoliosis SOS, our ScolioGold treatment method uses manual and physical interventions to treat scoliosis sufferers; however, this does not make up the entirety of our treatment approach. Instead, we combine this therapy with stretches and exercises to form a more holistic treatment plan, which addresses multiple aspects of the sufferer’s condition, as opposed to focusing on a single element of the condition. ScolioGold is a long-term system of care that is designed to help scoliosis patients self-manage their condition rather than forcing them to rely on repeated visits to a practitioner.
 
To find out more about our ScolioGold programme, visit our Video Experiences and Testimonials page to see how we have helped previous patients to correct and improve their scoliosis symptoms. You can also get in touch to enquire about our courses, by filling in our quick enquiry form here.
scoliois physical therapy
 
No two cases of scoliosis are exactly alike – symptoms and their severity vary hugely from patient to patient and depend on a number of contributing factors. Due to several possibilities in how scoliosis can occur and progress, no one treatment is universally effective; certain treatment routes may be effective for some patients but fail to provide the desired results for others.
 
Another issue that often arises when it comes to treating scoliosis concerns the patient’s personal circumstances and physical abilities. The typically-recommended treatment for progressive curves in young people is a back brace, which is fitted to the patient’s exact measurements and worn for extended periods of time in an effort to limit curve progression. For patients whose curves are progressing at a particularly rapid rate (to a degree that has the potential to limit their mobility, breathing capacity and overall health), spinal fusion surgery is often recommended in order to permanently halt the curvature’s progression. While these options may provide encouraging results for some, others may find them ineffective or limiting, and this prompts many scoliosis sufferers to seek out alternative treatments.
 
One approach that is often discussed as an alternative to surgery and bracing for treating scoliosis is physical therapy – that is, the non-invasive treatment of spinal curvature via a series of exercises and manipulations. While this type of therapy can be an effective form of treatment for scoliosis when performed correctly, the term ‘physical therapy’ is very broad, and individuals are often left confused as to what this treatment actually involves.
 
Below is an explanation of how and why physical therapy is used to treat scoliosis, along with a closer look at the forms of physical therapy that we use here at our clinic:

Why is Physical Therapy Used to Treat Scoliosis?

Scoliosis patients may seek treatment via physical therapy for a number of reasons, including:
  • Avoiding the complications and physical limitations associated with surgery.
  • Improving body image by reducing the visibility of the curve and avoiding surgery scars.
  • Improving flexibility and mobility by strengthening the muscles surrounding the spine.
  • Relieving the pain caused by scoliosis (often experienced by scoliosis suffers who have undergone surgery).
  • Preventing curve progression using corrective techniques in a way that allows continued maintenance and improvement.

How Does Physical Therapy Work?

Physical therapy for scoliosis works by repeating a series of corrective movements and techniques, which are intended to limit restrictions, improve posture, strengthen the back muscles, and increase the patient’s range of motion. All of this contributes to reducing the level of pain experienced by the patient, along with improving their physical ability and correcting the visual symptoms of the condition.
 
Here at Scoliosis SOS, we achieve optimal results for each patient by assessing and treating their condition on an individual basis and by providing a range of targeted physical therapies that treat the various aspects of their scoliosis condition. While the Schroth method forms the foundations of our treatment approach, this is complemented and supported by a range of other proven techniques, which work in unison to form our ScolioGold treatment programme.
 
To find out more about how physical therapy can be used to treat scoliosis, or to discuss the unique requirements of your condition, simply get in touch with the Scoliosis SOS team today.
 
Further Reading: Meet Our Physiotherapists

Phsyiotherapist with patient

When performed correctly, physical therapy is an effective form of treatment for scoliosis, and is often used as an alternative to having to wear a back brace or undergo spinal fusion surgery. However, physiotherapy is a very broad and varied field, and it can be hard to decide which type of physical therapy is best-suited to combating your spinal curve.

The NHS provides physiotherapy treatment for scoliosis sufferers, and many people resort to this to treat their condition. However, here at Scoliosis SOS, we offer a different form of physiotherapy that we call the ScolioGold method, and we feel it’s a more effective form of physiotherapy that will provide far better results than those available from the NHS.

In order to demonstrate this, we’ve compared the two treatment methods and shown you where we differ from NHS physiotherapy below.

Physiotherapists

  • ScolioGold

Our physiotherapists have been specifically trained to treat scoliosis, and have also undergone months of extensive additional training and examinations to ensure they have the skills to treat a whole range of complex spinal conditions (including hyperkyphosis).

  • NHS Physiotherapy

There are no specialist physiotherapists for scoliosis at the NHS, and although they may have physiotherapy degrees, a recent study highlighted physio students’ lack of knowledge when it came to scoliosis and how to treat it. Our medical team are regularly invited to guest lecture on scoliosis at a number of UK universities and hospitals.

Treatment

  • ScolioGold

Our ScolioGold method is a hybrid of several scoliosis-specific treatments, exercises and methods from all around the world. By combining techniques such as FITS, SEAS, and osteopathy, we aim to provide the best non-invasive scoliosis treatment possible. In order to target each patient’s goals and give them the best possible care, we offer a combination of hands-on group therapies and individualised scoliosis-specific exercises. Our treatment method is continually monitored, and it constantly develops to reflect new advances in the non-surgical field, thus ensuring that our therapy continues to deliver gold-standard results. There’s no limit on the number of therapy sessions we can provide; you may attend as many as you feel you need.

As well as providing physiotherapy, we also deliver radiation-free spinal and gain scanning, ergonomic assessments, and insole fitting to optimise posture and back health. We also provide patient education and long-term treatment and care plans for this lifelong condition.

  • NHS Physiotherapy

NHS physiotherapy programmes consist of generic stretches and strengthening exercises that are non-specific to your condition. There’s minimal hands-on therapy due to time constraints, and in some hospitals, physiotherapists are no longer allowed to even touch their patients, instead directing them to websites for advice and care.

There are an increasingly limited number of physiotherapy sessions available due to NHS budget cuts, and most trusts offer a maximum of 6 x 30 minute appointments. Furthermore, you will often not see the same therapist from one session to the next, which results in a lack of continuity in care. There’s also no aftercare, no follow-up appointments, and no ongoing advice or support.

To find out more about ScolioGold therapy, please click here. You can also get in touch with Scoliosis SOS by calling 0207 488 4428 or by filling out our contact form.

Neuromuscular Scoliosis
 

In most cases of scoliosis, the patient’s spinal curvature is not triggered by any known cause. However, this is not the case for all forms of the condition. Some types of scoliosis occur as a result of other medical conditions; this is true of neuromuscular scoliosis (commonly referred to as myopathic scoliosis).

What is neuromuscular scoliosis?

People with this type of scoliosis are impacted by disorders of the brain, the spinal cord, and the muscular system, the weakness of which leads to an abnormal spinal curvature. The rate and risk of progression is often much higher than for other types of scoliosis, which makes neuromuscular scoliosis one of the most severe forms of the condition.

The following conditions are often linked to neuromuscular scoliosis:

  • Cerebral Palsy: This condition causes muscle weakness, uncontrolled body movements, poor co-ordination, and other issues. To find out more about its connection with scoliosis, read our blog post here.

  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A disease which impacts the nerve cells connecting the brain and spinal cord to the body’s muscles. With progression, the disease can lead to a gradual weakening of the muscles, making physical activities more and more difficult. Find out more in our previous blog post.

  • Spina Bifida:  A condition which impacts the development of the spine, leaving a gap. This leads to mobility issues, bowel problems, and a build-up of fluid on the brain.

  • Muscular Dystrophy: This term refers to a collective group of medical conditions which cause the muscles to weaken, leading to a progressive loss of physical ability. Mutations cause changes in the muscle fibres, interfering with their ability to function. In most cases, these mutations are passed down genetically from parent to child.

  • Spinal Cord Injuries: Bruises and tears which cause damage to the spinal cord, impacting the ability of the brain to transmit messages to the rest of the body.

How does neuromuscular scoliosis affect the patient?

  • Progression: Due to the fact that this type of scoliosis is common in children with the conditions listed above, it can often become worse during growth spurts. This progression can lead to a collapsed torso and a raised diaphragm, which impacts the patient’s lung function. This can be even more severe in cases where the muscles which control breathing are already weak.

  • Symptoms: Often, patients with neuromuscular scoliosis who are able to walk will display similar symptoms to those with idiopathic scoliosis: tilted shoulders, uneven waist/hips, and prominence of the ribs on one side. For patients who require the use of mobility aids due to the severity of their condition, the symptoms can include those mentioned above, as well as changes in overall posture, a tilted pelvis, progressive loss of the ability to sit unsupported, and pressure sores. In addition to these symptoms, patients may also suffer from other types of spinal curves, including kyphosis and lordosis.

How is the Condition Treated?

While a brace may be suggested in an attempt to prevent the progression of the spinal curve, in the most severe cases, neuromuscular scoliosis surgery is usually recommended in order to halt the curve’s development. The condition also calls for regular monitoring, with regular hospital appointments to assess the progression of the curve.
 
If possible, exercise is also recommended as a form of treatment for neuromuscular scoliosis, in order to strengthen the muscles surrounding the spine which have become weak as a result of the patient’s condition. We at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic have treated numerous patients with neuromuscular conditions using our ScolioGold method.
 
Would you like to find out how we can help to treat the symptoms of your neuromuscular scoliosis? Please click here to get in touch with the Scoliosis SOS team.
Bad Posture

Scoliosis (a sideways curvature of the spine) can be caused by all sorts of different factors. For example, if your muscles are weakened by a condition such as cerebral palsy or Guillain-Barré syndrome, this can lead to a curvature of the spine that progresses over time. Some children are born with scoliosis because their spines didn’t develop properly in the womb; on the other hand, scoliosis sometimes develops much later in life due to the deterioration of the spine’s intervertebral discs with age. Of course, the vast majority of scoliosis sufferers have idiopathic scoliosis, which usually arrives with puberty and has no known cause.

But now that we’ve covered some of the things that do cause scoliosis, let’s talk about something that definitely doesn’t.

Bad posture doesn’t cause scoliosis…

Bad posture can have a very detrimental effect on your general health, but there is no evidence that slouching in a chair or hunching over your laptop can cause scoliosis. As we recently clarified in our Scoliosis Myths blog post, the same goes for:
  • Wearing a rucksack on just one shoulder
  • Playing a heavy guitar
  • Carrying weighty loads on your back
The causes of scoliosis are many and varied, but generally speaking, the condition only ever arises as a result of genetic factors or neuromuscular / skeletal deterioration. Poor posture is not a recognised cause of scoliosis.

…but bad posture is still bad for you!

Of course, just because something doesn’t cause scoliosis doesn’t mean that it can’t affect your health in other ways. We’ve discussed the effects of bad posture in previous blog posts, but we’d like to briefly revisit the potential consequences of postural health now, just to make sure you understand them.

Bad posture CAN cause:
  • Back pain
  • Neck pain
  • Shoulder pain
  • Arm pain
  • Hyperkyphosis (another curvature of the spine – hyperkyphosis is a forward curve, whereas scoliosis goes sideways)
Our ScolioGold treatment courses can help hyperkyphosis sufferers as well as scoliosis patients – in fact, one of our most famous patients came to us for help combating his hyperkyphosis. Nick “Topper” Headon, who was the drummer for British punk band The Clash (of ‘London Caling’ and ‘Rock the Casbah’ fame) from 1977-1982, developed a kyphotic spinal curve after years spent hunching over a drum kit; he completed a two-week course at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, and this enabled him to come off the medication he had been taking to help him cope with his back pain.

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