Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we treat scoliosis and other spinal conditions not through surgery or bracing but with a purely exercise-based programme called the ScolioGold method. We have found that stretches and exercises can be extremely effective in the treatment of a curved spine, and our research backs this finding up: ScolioGold consistently helps patients to achieve a better quality of life. Our treatment courses reduce pain, improve flexibility, and can dramatically reverse the progress of a scoliotic curve (see results here).

The stretches below will not halt the progression of your scoliosis, but they can help to improve your strength and balance while relieving some symptoms of the condition. Please note that these stretches should not be construed as a substitute for a full treatment course delivered by a chartered physiotherapist.

Chest Stretch

Chest Stretch

  1. Stand upright with your feet roughly shoulder-width apart.
  2. Extend your arms out behind your back.
  3. Push your arms back and press your shoulder blades together.
  4. Hold this position for a few seconds, then relax and repeat several times.

Back Stretch

Back Stretch 1

  1. Stand upright with your feet roughly shoulder-width apart.
  2. Extend your arms out in front of your chest.
  3. Lace your fingers together and push until you feel a stretch in your upper back.
  4. Hold this position for a few seconds, then relax and repeat several times.

Back Stretch 2

  1. Stand facing a wall with your feet roughly shoulder-width apart.
  2. Lean forward until your upper body is almost at a right-angle to your legs.
  3. Extend your arms out in front of you and press your palms against the wall.
  4. Try to straighten your back so that it is parallel to the floor.
  5. Hold this position for a few seconds, then relax and repeat several times.
If you would like to attend a full 4-week scoliosis treatment course at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, please click here to contact us and arrange an initial consultation.

More scoliosis exercises to try:
Disclaimer: The above information should not be treated as medical advice and the scoliosis exercises described may not be suitable or beneficial for everyone. You should not begin any exercise routine without consulting a qualified health practitioner, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, elderly, or if you have any chronic or recurring conditions. Any application of scoliosis exercises suggested is at the reader’s sole discretion and risk. Scoliosis SOS accepts no responsibility or liability for any loss or injuries caused directly or indirectly through the performing of any exercises described. If you feel any discomfort or pain during exercise, stop immediately. Always consult your own GP if you are in any way concerned about your health or anything associated with it.
One question that’s often asked about scoliosis is whether or not it counts as a disability. Many scoliosis sufferers are themselves uncertain about this, so today we’d like to try and provide some concrete information on the subject.
 
A ‘disability’ can be defined in a number of different ways, making this question a difficult one to answer simply. We’ve approached it from a few different angles below; please note that all information given here is based on UK legislation, so the facts of the issue may differ if you live elsewhere in the world.

Are children with scoliosis eligible for DLA?

If you have a child under the age of 16 who suffers from a disability, you may be able to claim some money from the government to help you look after them. This is known as the Disability Living Allowance (DLA), and claimants can receive anywhere from £21.80 to £139.75 per week depending on the severity of the child’s disability.
 
So does scoliosis qualify as a disability in this instance? According to www.gov.uk, your child must meet at least one of the following criteria in order to claim DLA payments:
  • They need more looking after than a non-disabled child of the same age
  • They have difficulty getting about
Scoliosis affects a lot of people under the age of 16, but relatively few of these cases are so severe as to necessitate special care or impair the child’s ability to get around. You will not be able to claim DLA for your child’s scoliosis unless at least one of the above points applies to them.

Can adults with scoliosis claim disability payments?

Under the current rules, there are two forms of financial assistance available to disabled adults in the UK: Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is for people aged 16 to 64, while people aged 65 and over can claim Attendance Allowance. PIP, like DLA, pays out anywhere from £21.80 to £139.75 a week; Attendance Allowance claimants receive either £55.10 or £82.30 a week.
 
Eligibility for these two schemes is dependent on a variety of factors, but for now we’re just going to focus on the question of whether a curved spine is enough of a disability to qualify for PIP / Attendance Allowance. According to the UK government’s website, the requirements are as follows…

PIP (for adults aged 16-64):

To claim PIP, you must have a long-term health condition or disability that affects your ‘daily living’ and/or makes it hard for you to get around. You can only claim if you have been experiencing these difficulties for at least 3 months and expect them to continue for at least another 9 months (though that last part doesn’t apply to terminally ill claimants).
 
There are two types of PIP: the daily living component and the mobility component. Some people receive both, while others receive just one. You may be able to claim the daily living component if your scoliosis makes it difficult for you to carry out routine tasks such as bathing, getting dressed, and preparing meals; the mobility component could be available to you if your curved spine prevents you from getting around easily.

Attendance Allowance (for adults aged 65 and over):

The Attendance Allowance scheme is designed to help older people pay for any care they require as a result of health conditions and/or disabilities. Payments are made according to a two-tier system: the lower rate (£55.10 per week) is given to people who need help/supervision during the day OR during the night, while the higher rate (£82.30 per week) is reserved for terminally ill people and individuals who require help/supervision around the clock.
 
In order to qualify for Attendance Allowance, you must meet both of the following criteria:
  • You have a physical disability and/or a mental disability
  • Your disability is severe enough that you require supervision and/or help caring for yourself
You may be able to claim an Attendance Allowance if your scoliosis means that you require the care or supervision of another person.

Can scoliosis sufferers park in disabled bays?

Financial aid aside, another benefit afforded to disabled people in the UK is the Blue Badge, which allows the holder to park in spaces that are reserved for disabled people.
 
 
There are a number of things that can qualify you for a Blue Badge – in particular, people who claim the mobility component of the Personal Independence Payment (see above) are almost always eligible. There is a Blue Badge eligibility tool on the government’s website that will help you to determine whether or not you qualify for a Blue Badge in minutes.
 
So let’s come back to the big question: is scoliosis a disability? No matter how you define disability, the answer – at least here in the UK – is almost always no, unless it limits your ability to get around and perform daily tasks.
 
In other words, it tends to depend almost entirely on the severity of your spinal curve. Scoliosis doesn’t automatically count as a disability; each case has to be assessed individually.
 
If you are suffering from scoliosis – no matter how mild or how severe – we at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic can help you to overcome your symptoms and achieve a better quality of life.
 
How we helped a woman with tricuspid atresia to manage her spinal curve

Katrina

Congenital heart disease (CHD) can manifest itself in a number of different ways. For example, people born with tricuspid atresia – an absence of the heart’s tricuspid valve – frequently experience fatigue, shortness of breath, and cyanosis (where the skin assumes a bluish tinge due to poor circulation).

Pertinently for us here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, tricuspid atresia can also be accompanied by curvature of the spine. Some years ago (when our clinic was still located in Suffolk), we treated a woman named Katrina – pictured above – who suffered from both tricuspid atresia and scoliosis. Katrina, who was in her twenties at the time, had undergone spinal fusion surgery as a teenager in the hope that this would correct her spinal curve; however, she received no further treatment or physiotherapy after the operation, and her curve subsequently began to progress once again. By 2007, she was experiencing constant pain and difficulty walking. Her scoliosis was even affecting her lung capacity – particularly problematic when you’ve already got a heart condition.

Katrina had all but abandoned hope of overcoming her scoliosis, but our ScolioGold treatment programme proved to be an effective solution, succeeding where spinal fusion surgery had failed her. Our exercise-based course helped Katrina to manage her spinal condition and dramatically improve her quality of life – here’s what she herself said in an article for GUCH News (issue 58, published spring 2009):

“The course taught me how to manage my condition and to maintain my corrected posture without the help of a therapist…I now visit the clinic every 12 weeks for a refresher and to learn new exercises. I am able to speak to the therapists at any time if I need advice or have any problems.

“I am very lucky to have the clinic so close to me, however I advise anyone who has scoliosis and may be looking for further advice to ring the clinic and see what they can offer you…if you live far enough away they can provide self-catering accommodation nearby.”
– Katrina Clarke, ‘My Experience at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic’

Scoliosis can be caused by any number of different factors; in fact, very often, the cause is not even clear (this is known as idiopathic scoliosis). Scoliosis sufferers with congenital heart defects are just one subset of our diverse patient base, and we are capable of providing effective non-surgical treatment for a wide variety of different spinal conditions at any time of life.

To learn more about our ScolioGold treatment courses and book an initial consultation with Scoliosis SOS, please contact us today.
Spinal Treatment

When seeking out non-surgical treatments for scoliosis, it’s easy to feel somewhat overwhelmed and confused by the number of approaches which exist, particularly when their aims appear to be so similar. Physiotherapists, chiropractors, osteopaths…what do all of these practitioners actually do? How do their methods differ from one another? Are these titles all just different names for the same thing? These are common questions among scoliosis sufferers and other individuals seeking out physical therapy.

In order to clear up some confusion, we thought we’d outline the details of each approach and highlight their similarities and differences. To begin, it’s probably easiest to discuss the aims and practices of each treatment method individually:

Physiotherapy

The primary aim of physiotherapy is to enable function and movement in the body, often after an accident, illness, or other form of trauma. A combination of massage, exercise and movement is used to restore the body of the patient, improving their physical ability and preventing further damage/progression. Physiotherapy is often used to treat and aid recovery from several conditions, from injuries impacting the joints and soft tissues to those affecting the brain, heart and lungs.

Chiropractic

The chiropractic profession specialises in diagnosing and treating conditions which affect the joints, ligaments, tendons and nerves,  always focusing on the spine. In its most basic form, treatment involves the gentle manipulation of specific areas in order to free joints in the spine, although alternative treatments such as acupuncture are sometimes integrated into the therapy. While most chiropractors specifically treat conditions related to the spine and neck, they do provide treatment for a number of related conditions as well.

Osteopathy

Osteopaths work to ensure that the muscles, ligaments and connective tissues in the body are able to function smoothly together in order to treat conditions which affect these areas of the body, particularly the spine. A combination of physical manipulation, massage and stretching is used to increase patient mobility while also restoring balance and optimal function within the body. This works to relieve muscle tension, improve blood supply, and promote healing, providing the patient with improved health and relief from pain.

As you can see from these descriptions, these treatment methods have many things in common, primarily their holistic approach to improving overall bodily function alongside the treatment of a specific concern. Here at Scoliosis SOS, we use some elements of osteopathy alongside specialised physiotherapy as part of our ScolioGold treatment programme, which combines the principles of several proven non-surgical treatment methods in order to fully treat various issues experienced by our patients.

Our reason for including some components of osteopathy in our successful therapy, exercise and treatment programme is to improve joint mobility while also providing relief from the pain experienced by many scoliosis sufferers. It has allowed us to provide lasting results for our patients, improving their posture and enhancing their ease of movement – aspects of scoliosis which are often not properly addressed by surgical treatment.

If you would like to find out more about our treatment programme and how it may be able to help you with your condition, please get in touch here.
Scoliometer

Here at Scoliosis SOS, we are proud to treat scoliosis sufferers from every corner of the globe; if you’ve visited our Overseas Patients page, you’ll know that people have travelled to our clinic from all over Europe, as well as from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and North America.

One foreign country from which we frequently receive enquiries is Canada, with many Canadian scoliosis sufferers making the transatlantic journey to our London clinic each year. (That’s London, England not London, Ontario!)

Twisted Sister Thrown a Curve

If you often read about scoliosis online then you may have come across a blog called Twisted Sister. This blog is written by a woman named Jennifer from Vancouver, and it details her experiences as a scoliosis sufferer and her quest to get treated and overcome the symptoms of her spinal condition.

Jennifer is actually one of the many Canadian people we have treated here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic. She first came to us in 2013 after reading about us online, and she blogged about her treatment course while she was staying in London (for instance, you can read about her first day at the clinic here).

Last year, Jennifer returned to the Scoliosis SOS Clinic and recorded this short video interview with us:

Why Travel to the UK for Scoliosis Treatment?

Canada to England is a long journey, but as we feel Jennifer would testify, it can be a very worthwhile trip indeed. Non-surgical scoliosis treatment remains outside the mainstream in Canada, and finding an effective alternative to surgery within the country’s borders can be difficult.

Our treatment programme, the ScolioGold method, is proven effective; as our research has shown, it can visibly reduce a scoliosis patient’s Cobb angle measurement, as well as providing pain relief and improving flexibility and self-image.

Jessie Bowen, a 23-year-old girl from North Canada, was another scoliosis sufferer who came to us from the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. You can read her story in full here, but to demonstrate just how life-changing our treatment courses can be, we’d just like to share a short excerpt from her testimonial now:

“I never thought when I went to Scoliosis SOS that I would gain so much. I never knew what I wanted to do as a career, but throughout the time I spent at the clinic, it just clicked, and I realised how important physiotherapy work is. I am now working with patients and teaching them about their various conditions.

“I can’t explain how grateful I am to the SOS Clinic, as without them, I may have lost my flexibility forever.”

If you live in Canada – or anywhere else in the world – and you would like to find out more about the non-surgical scoliosis treatment courses we deliver here in London, please contact us today. We will be happy to answer any questions you have, and we can even conduct a full consultation with you via Skype or telephone call.
Back Pain

If you have scoliosis (sideways curvature of the spine), it can impact your life in all manner of different ways. Common symptoms of this condition include compromised breathing, reduced mobility / flexibility, and muscle imbalances, as well as more visual signs such as uneven shoulders or hips.

In addition to the above symptoms, many scoliosis sufferers also endure varying degrees of back pain. But does this mean that your own back pain could be a sign that you too have a curved spine?

Scoliosis isn’t always painful

First of all, it’s important to understand that not all scoliosis sufferers experience back pain as a result of their condition. Some scoliotics suffer severe and debilitating pain every day, while others report no back pain whatsoever. Some people have to take maximum-strength painkillers to cope with their scoliosis, while others get by on a lighter dose and others don’t need any medication at all.

You might assume that the level of pain you feel depends on the severity of your spinal curvature, but there’s no evidence to support this – we have seen people with relatively mild curves go through absolute agony, and we have met patients with extremely pronounced scoliosis who experience practically zero pain as a result of this.

So now that we’ve established that scoliosis doesn’t necessarily equal back pain, let’s take a look at that equation in reverse: is back pain a strong indicator that you may be suffering from scoliosis?

In a word: no.

Back pain alone is not a reliable symptom of scoliosis

The problem is that back pain can arise due to any number of factors besides scoliosis. You might have a different curvature of the spine (such as hyperkyphosis), or you might have some other problem entirely – you may have injured yourself lifting heavy objects incorrectly, or perhaps you have poor posture and it’s beginning to take its toll.

Instead of jumping to the conclusion that you have scoliosis simply because you are experiencing persistent back pain, look for these other, more reliable signs of a spinal curvature:
  • Shoulders sitting at different heights
  • Body leaning to one side
  • One shoulder blade protruding more prominently than the other
  • Uneven hips, waist, rib cage and/or legs
Whether or not they are accompanied by back pain, these symptoms are far more likely to point to scoliosis than back pain and back pain alone.

However, here at Scoliosis SOS, we treat a variety of patients with a range of different conditions, not just those with scoliosis. We use our specialised ScolioGold therapy to address a multitude of back and spinal conditions, thereby improving each patient’s quality of life and well-being.

Whether you suffer from scoliosis or just general back pain caused by poor posture, it’s a good idea to seek treatment right away, as your condition may progress further if left unchecked. Contact Scoliosis SOS today to arrange a consultation at our clinic in London and find out how we can help eliminate any muscular pain you are currently experiencing.
Mild Scoliosis
 
While we’re proud to have treated many cases of severe scoliosis here at our clinic, we’re often asked about the need to address mild scoliosis, and whether or not those with less pronounced curves should even seek treatment at all.
 
Generally, scoliosis sufferers with a Cobb angle of 20° or less are categorised as having ‘mild’ scoliosis, and are often told to simply monitor their condition as opposed to seeking treatment immediately. This is often due to the assumption that the condition is not considered to be particularly problematic or inhibitive at this level, although there is evidence to challenge that assumption – many people with mild scoliosis still suffer from pain, postural problems, and difficulties with certain physical activities, among other issues.
 
The biggest risk associated with milder cases of scoliosis is that of gradual wear and tear on the body’s soft tissues, vertebrae and disks, along with the possibility that the condition could eventually progress into a more severe curvature. There are several factors which increase the possibility of the condition progressing, including the growth of sufferers who are diagnosed at a young age. Simply being female, in fact, can also mean that a patient has a greater chance of their curve progressing, which is why it is important to consider preventative measures in order to halt further damage. 
 
Here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, we believe in providing a treatment plan which not only reduces the Cobb angle but also provides a means of continued improvement and relief from the negative side effects of scoliosis. This makes it ideal for patients with mild scoliosis, as it not only facilitates a further reduction of the existing spinal curve, but also helps to prevent a progression of the condition over time. It is also ideal for children who show symptoms of developing scoliosis at an early age, allowing them to avoid further complications and restrictions later in life.
 
Nine-year-old Sara is one such patient. She was diagnosed with scoliosis after her brother required spinal surgery for his own severe curvature. Desperate to prevent her condition from progressing to the same stage as her sibling’s, Sara’s family sought early-stage treatment at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic, with amazing results:
 
 
If you have been diagnosed with mild scoliosis, or suspect that you or a loved one is at risk of developing the condition, please get in touch with Scoliosis SOS today to find out how our treatment programmes could help.

Even in its mildest form, scoliosis can have an immense impact on a person’s life; at its most severe, it can practically prevent people from living their lives at all.

 
Severe Scoliosis
 
The definition of what exactly constitutes severe scoliosis tends to vary depending on who you’re asking. Some specialists define as ‘severe’ any case where the Cobb angle is greater than 55 degrees (in fully-grown patients; the threshold for adolescents and children is lower). This is roughly the line beyond which surgery tends to be recommended as a suitable course of treatment.
 
However, while the Cobb angle is a useful tool for measuring the progress of scoliosis, that number is not necessarily the be-all and end-all when it comes to determining the true severity of a scoliosis sufferer’s condition. Many people have walked through the doors of the Scoliosis SOS Clinic with curves a long way short of that 55-degree threshold that nevertheless makes life miserable for the patients themselves. Symptoms such as chronic pain, limited mobility, and reduced self-esteem are not exclusive to those with a Cobb angle of 55+ degrees, and patients who are over that line don’t necessarily suffer any more than those who aren’t. Every patient is unique, and the treatment provided ought to reflect that fact.
 

Help for those with severe scoliosis

The effects of severe scoliosis are multifaceted and can be dealt with in a number of different ways. Doctors may prescribe medication to help with chronic pain, whereas the psychological impact of scoliosis (e.g. negative body image, low self-esteem) can sometimes be helped by counselling.
 
As mentioned, surgery is often recommended as a means of correcting more pronounced spinal curvatures, but this is not always necessary, even in severe cases. Here at Scoliosis SOS, we routinely treat patients with Cobb angle measurements of 60 degrees or more – in fact, our ScolioGold treatment courses have helped people exhibiting curves of up to 120 degrees!
 
Here’s what our treatment programmes can achieve for people with severe scoliosis:
Our exercise-based courses can also significantly improve the flexibility and mobility of scoliosis sufferers, helping them to enjoy a better quality of life all around.

Severe scoliosis – before and after:

Severe scoliosis before and after
A patient with severe scoliosis, before (left) and after (right) ScolioGold treatment.
 
Take a look at our video here where we helped treat a patient suffering from severe scoliosis and a 55-degree Cobb angle:
 
 
 
You can find more information about our treatment courses to help with your severe scoliosis or contact us to arrange an initial consultation (this can be conducted via Skype or over the phone if you are unable to visit our clinic in person) below!
 
Our Treatment Courses >                                Get in Touch > 
 

Here at Scoliosis SOS, we treat scoliosis using what we call the ScolioGold method. This is our very own unique approach to scoliosis therapy, and it combines a range of different non-surgical techniques to ensure that our patients are getting the best possible results. 

One of the techniques included in our ScolioGold programme is the SEAS method. SEAS stands for Scientific Exercise Approach to Scoliosis, and it’s an approach that was first developed in Italy during the 1990s. SEAS is a specific form of auto-correction (active self-correction) that’s taught individually to each patient. This is then complemented by stabilisation exercises that focus on neuromuscular control, proprioception and balance.

About the SEAS Method

The SEAS method is the result of research efforts by ISICO (Istituto Scientifico Italiano Colonna Vertabrale), Italy’s largest network for the treatment of spinal conditions. The method is a special type of energetic self-correction and the exercises implemented through SEAS are intended to train the neuromotor function to stimulate a self-corrected posture during the activities of daily life. The exercises that are included in this method help to prevent further deterioration of the patient’s spine, and since they are very simple, they can be applied in any location with minimal use of external support or equipment.

The reason why we include the SEAS method in our treatment programme is because it is a very active correctional technique and allows patients to minutely control their muscles without reliance on complicated exercises. Many of our patients are intimidated by the prospect of going through spinal surgery to treat their condition, as surgery can limit ease of movement, and there is also a high risk that the patient may experience considerable pain post-operation. For these reasons, SEAS and ScolioGold often prove to be a viable alternative treatment choice for scoliosis and hyperkyphosis patients facing spinal fusion surgery.

As with all of the methods included in our ScolioGold programme. SEAS has been thoroughly researched and scientifically proven, so you can rest assured that you are in safe hands when receiving treatment here at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic.

If you would like to learn more about the methods included in our ScolioGold treatment, please click here. To book an initial consultation, or you have any questions or queries about our non-surgical treatments, get in touch today
Scoliosis can impact anyone at any time of life, but the condition can be especially challenging in older patients. This is due in part to the increased chance of additional diseases or disorders – such as osteoporosis – being present.


Scoliosis most commonly affects adolescents (most cases are diagnosed between the ages of 10 and 15), and the cause is not usually known. However, in older patients, scoliosis often materialises due to asymmetric degeneration that wears through the body’s facet joints and intervertebral discs. This has a very distinct appearance on X-rays, and the resulting spinal curvature tend to be very steep, with sideways slippage of the bone in the middle (called a lateral listhesis); this is usually caused by the weakening of fibres in the discs. Canal stenosis – the narrowing of holes in spinal nerves – is another common occurrence in degenerative scoliosis, which can often lead to pain that radiates down into the hips and legs.

How can we treat scoliosis in older people? 

Available scoliosis treatment options can become somewhat limited in later life. Back braces tend to be less effective, and it can be difficult for older patients to go through and recover from surgery. It is not guaranteed that surgery will ‘fix’ the problem for good, and there is a high possibility of the patient experiencing pain and reduced mobility and flexibility post-operation.

Instead, we at the Scoliosis SOS Clinic treat the condition using our own unique combination of exercise-based techniques; we call this the ScolioGold method. By using our own treatment regime, we are able to offer patients an unrivalled level of treatment success; we have an expert team of consultants and physiotherapists on-site, and we are continually monitoring and developing our method in order to ensure that it continues to deliver top results. We have treated many elderly patients, helping them to overcome the effects of scoliosis without the need for a back brace or surgical intervention.

One such patient is 75-year-old Brenda Kenyon from Cheshire, who didn’t even know she had scoliosis until 2010. She has now been attending the Scoliosis SOS Clinic for 6 years, and we’ll let Brenda tell the rest of the story herself:


To see what we can achieve when treating scoliosis in older people, please click here. If you are interested in attending one of our 4-week treatment courses yourself, please get in touch with us to book your initial consultation.